Is anyone out there on Eliquis?

Posted by catmom777 @catmom777, Thu, Mar 21 9:55am

I had some side effects with Xarelto, so the doc put me on Eliquis, but now I'm feeling dizzy on this too. At least I think it's the Eliquis. It's kind of like a trap. I am supposed to take it for my afib, and I can't go off it because I might get a blood clot if I do, so I keep taking it. I've been taking it for five days now. The first couple days I felt no effects. It was the same way with Xarelto. I was fine for a couple days, then started feeling very dizzy and had some eye issues too.

@afrobin

Hi cat mom, If I were you I would find it hard to believe that drinking what sounds like a normal amount of water and cutting back on salt could cause your sodium level to sink so low that you need to be hospitalized. The hospitals would be full of patients with your symptoms. Did you exercise and sweat a lot due to the heat maybe? I would seriously do your homework and see what else it could be. I checked out the side effects of Eliquis and sure enough there is a lot of bleeding, weakness and feeling faint but nothing about low sodium levels.
Check this out: Are you on any of these drugs: https://www.merckmanuals.com/en-ca/home/hormonal-and-metabolic-disorders/electrolyte-balance/hyponatremia-low-level-of-sodium-in-the-blood Why not ask your pharmacist to help you figure this out? They study drug interactions and side effects for 6 years in university.

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I went in to see my pharmacist yesterday but he was real busy and couldn't talk to me. Maybe next time. I don't know how all that happened. I can't explain it. I had been feeling dizzy, confused, disoriented, and feeling awful for days, and increasingly so. I was convinced it was the blood thinners but the ER docs told me it wasn't. That's when they admitted me. They thought something was going on with my heart that didn't show up on the EKG. I also had chest pain BTW. After a heart stress test and an echocardiagram they determined that it was low sodium. Low sodium causes the brain to swell, which produced the symptoms I was having. After about 18 hours on a saline drip, I started to feel better and they released me when my sodium level got up to 132. It's supposed to be at least 136. Now, when I feel those symptoms, I take some Himalayan salt crystals and wait it out. That worked yesterday. Also though, they told me I had an electrolyte imbalance and was supposed to pick up some Gatorade. Maybe it's all this that initially caused my heart to go into afib because I've been told salt is a conductor. Anyway, one step at at time to get this sorted out. I just want to feel good again. I haven't felt right since this started and don't know why. It's all been so much to absorb.

Liked by yorlik

REPLY

Being a good health detective is a must because doctors don't have the time to figure it all out for you.
I would love to know what other meds you are on, cat mom. Have you gone on sites that give reasons for sodium to drop. I have and it's worth delving into it all (with a positive attitude of "I'm going to figure this out and beat this, damnit!".
That's how I am working on my 31 rounds of antibiotics in 3 years 3 months issue…and so far, touch wood, with lots of lifestyle changes and a few supplements, a new kind of estrogen (only 2 weeks in however) no return of the bladder infections. Usually by now, I am into the next UTI so I am very encouraged…and even proud of myself.
And as I told you, with exercise I beat my Afib. The cardiologist said it was impossible and that it would return (after almost 2 years on strong beta blockers) and as long as I kept FAR away from stimulants AND exercised, I have been fine…for 24 years now!
On my own with plenty of research, I also cured hives that were so bad that they required antihistamines. The 3 specialists I saw said no one knows why people get hives and that I would likely have to take antihistamines for the rest of my life. I hunted for a cure and finally I found it. A local health store owner who is also a licensed pharmacist, gave me the solution. What was it? Eliminating carbs (so basically meat, eggs, veggies…which today is a kept diet) and about 6 weeks later reintroducing rice, bread, potatoes, pasta very slowly and not much of it. Even now if I have something very sweet like a birthday cake, I will start to itch.
So I HIGHLY recommend spending a lot of time hunting and collecting information. Copy and paste in Word and formulate questions you can ask your pharmacist, doctor and eventually cardiologist.
Dizziness and weakness ARE side effects of Eliquis (look it up) and didn't those symptoms start once you started taking that drug? Or when you had your 'episodes', were you also experiencing weakness and dizziness? I am almost sure you wrote that the symptoms coincided with the start of the Eliquis…
Think positively like you are in a confusing maze and on your way to reaching the end of it and coming out into the open where the sun, clarity and fresh air await you. You can do it cat mom!

Liked by yorlik, catmom777

REPLY
@catmom777

I went in to see my pharmacist yesterday but he was real busy and couldn't talk to me. Maybe next time. I don't know how all that happened. I can't explain it. I had been feeling dizzy, confused, disoriented, and feeling awful for days, and increasingly so. I was convinced it was the blood thinners but the ER docs told me it wasn't. That's when they admitted me. They thought something was going on with my heart that didn't show up on the EKG. I also had chest pain BTW. After a heart stress test and an echocardiagram they determined that it was low sodium. Low sodium causes the brain to swell, which produced the symptoms I was having. After about 18 hours on a saline drip, I started to feel better and they released me when my sodium level got up to 132. It's supposed to be at least 136. Now, when I feel those symptoms, I take some Himalayan salt crystals and wait it out. That worked yesterday. Also though, they told me I had an electrolyte imbalance and was supposed to pick up some Gatorade. Maybe it's all this that initially caused my heart to go into afib because I've been told salt is a conductor. Anyway, one step at at time to get this sorted out. I just want to feel good again. I haven't felt right since this started and don't know why. It's all been so much to absorb.

Jump to this post

@catmom777 Hi catmom… I love that name. I have 3 kitties. One of the mistakes we can make as patients is to think that there is a causal relationship with something as in your example of linking your symptoms to a prescribed drug. While it might be true; it also might not. There are many variables in body chemistry, and a real scientific experiment has to eliminate other variables to be valid. Electrolytes are very important because all your muscles and nerve impulses are dependent on electricity that this generated by the charged ions crossing cell membranes. Your body needs sodium and potassium for this which are both positively charged. Potassium is absorbed because the sodium is kicked out of the cell by a "sodium pump" which by removing positively charged ions creates a void that is filled when the positively charged potassium ions enter the cell. The sodium crosses the cell membranes easily, but not potassium which is why your cells have to work to kick out sodium so they can absorb potassium. Both are necessary in the right amounts. Listen to your body and how you felt after the saline infusion. Your heart is the most important muscle in your body, and it generates it's own electrical signals to coordinate the heart beat. It's like a precision dance, and the atria have to pass the blood to the ventricles so they can send it out to the rest of the body. Thanks for sharing your experience. My elderly mom takes Eloquis and doesn't have symptoms of dizziness. there can be many other reasons for it too, some drug related, some physical problems in the inner ear, and sometimes problems with the spine that causes muscle spasms that move the upper cervical vertebrae which affects nerves and causes dizziness. That one I know about and have that in my own health experience. It's good to ask questions as a patient, and learn from it.

Liked by AFRobin, catmom777

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@jenniferhunter

@catmom777 Hi catmom… I love that name. I have 3 kitties. One of the mistakes we can make as patients is to think that there is a causal relationship with something as in your example of linking your symptoms to a prescribed drug. While it might be true; it also might not. There are many variables in body chemistry, and a real scientific experiment has to eliminate other variables to be valid. Electrolytes are very important because all your muscles and nerve impulses are dependent on electricity that this generated by the charged ions crossing cell membranes. Your body needs sodium and potassium for this which are both positively charged. Potassium is absorbed because the sodium is kicked out of the cell by a "sodium pump" which by removing positively charged ions creates a void that is filled when the positively charged potassium ions enter the cell. The sodium crosses the cell membranes easily, but not potassium which is why your cells have to work to kick out sodium so they can absorb potassium. Both are necessary in the right amounts. Listen to your body and how you felt after the saline infusion. Your heart is the most important muscle in your body, and it generates it's own electrical signals to coordinate the heart beat. It's like a precision dance, and the atria have to pass the blood to the ventricles so they can send it out to the rest of the body. Thanks for sharing your experience. My elderly mom takes Eloquis and doesn't have symptoms of dizziness. there can be many other reasons for it too, some drug related, some physical problems in the inner ear, and sometimes problems with the spine that causes muscle spasms that move the upper cervical vertebrae which affects nerves and causes dizziness. That one I know about and have that in my own health experience. It's good to ask questions as a patient, and learn from it.

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And also keep in mind that you are a tiny person so the dose could just be too strong for you.

Liked by yorlik, catmom777

REPLY
@afrobin

Being a good health detective is a must because doctors don't have the time to figure it all out for you.
I would love to know what other meds you are on, cat mom. Have you gone on sites that give reasons for sodium to drop. I have and it's worth delving into it all (with a positive attitude of "I'm going to figure this out and beat this, damnit!".
That's how I am working on my 31 rounds of antibiotics in 3 years 3 months issue…and so far, touch wood, with lots of lifestyle changes and a few supplements, a new kind of estrogen (only 2 weeks in however) no return of the bladder infections. Usually by now, I am into the next UTI so I am very encouraged…and even proud of myself.
And as I told you, with exercise I beat my Afib. The cardiologist said it was impossible and that it would return (after almost 2 years on strong beta blockers) and as long as I kept FAR away from stimulants AND exercised, I have been fine…for 24 years now!
On my own with plenty of research, I also cured hives that were so bad that they required antihistamines. The 3 specialists I saw said no one knows why people get hives and that I would likely have to take antihistamines for the rest of my life. I hunted for a cure and finally I found it. A local health store owner who is also a licensed pharmacist, gave me the solution. What was it? Eliminating carbs (so basically meat, eggs, veggies…which today is a kept diet) and about 6 weeks later reintroducing rice, bread, potatoes, pasta very slowly and not much of it. Even now if I have something very sweet like a birthday cake, I will start to itch.
So I HIGHLY recommend spending a lot of time hunting and collecting information. Copy and paste in Word and formulate questions you can ask your pharmacist, doctor and eventually cardiologist.
Dizziness and weakness ARE side effects of Eliquis (look it up) and didn't those symptoms start once you started taking that drug? Or when you had your 'episodes', were you also experiencing weakness and dizziness? I am almost sure you wrote that the symptoms coincided with the start of the Eliquis…
Think positively like you are in a confusing maze and on your way to reaching the end of it and coming out into the open where the sun, clarity and fresh air await you. You can do it cat mom!

Jump to this post

I have to get a handle on this. No option. I cannot go through life feeling like this. It's too awful. It's like having a low-level flu every morning which gradually lifts throughout the day but wears you out, and then going to bed about 8:30 or 9:00, being unable to sleep or sleeping very fitfully, waking up tired and feeling flueish all over again–day after day, with no explanation as to why.
Jennifer Hunter gave a very good explanation of why electrolytes, salt, and potassium are important to the heart. I will have a dose of electrolytes in a bit here after my high-salt lunch of tuna salad on crackers. For sure, something got out of whack in the past couple months. Whether it was stress, friends visiting and the different diet I ate when they were here, or alcohol, or winter depression–something happened, and it happened too fast for it to be just an age thing. Now getting back in balance is the tricky part, without making it all worse. Getting ready to go for a long walk and then will do my stretches and some yoga.
Thanks so much for sticking with this and telling me your experiences. It gives me hope. I'm spending about 50% of my day now online trying to figure out what is wrong. All the folks giving me clues helps point me in the right direction–you all are like guides.

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@jenniferhunter

@catmom777 Hi catmom… I love that name. I have 3 kitties. One of the mistakes we can make as patients is to think that there is a causal relationship with something as in your example of linking your symptoms to a prescribed drug. While it might be true; it also might not. There are many variables in body chemistry, and a real scientific experiment has to eliminate other variables to be valid. Electrolytes are very important because all your muscles and nerve impulses are dependent on electricity that this generated by the charged ions crossing cell membranes. Your body needs sodium and potassium for this which are both positively charged. Potassium is absorbed because the sodium is kicked out of the cell by a "sodium pump" which by removing positively charged ions creates a void that is filled when the positively charged potassium ions enter the cell. The sodium crosses the cell membranes easily, but not potassium which is why your cells have to work to kick out sodium so they can absorb potassium. Both are necessary in the right amounts. Listen to your body and how you felt after the saline infusion. Your heart is the most important muscle in your body, and it generates it's own electrical signals to coordinate the heart beat. It's like a precision dance, and the atria have to pass the blood to the ventricles so they can send it out to the rest of the body. Thanks for sharing your experience. My elderly mom takes Eloquis and doesn't have symptoms of dizziness. there can be many other reasons for it too, some drug related, some physical problems in the inner ear, and sometimes problems with the spine that causes muscle spasms that move the upper cervical vertebrae which affects nerves and causes dizziness. That one I know about and have that in my own health experience. It's good to ask questions as a patient, and learn from it.

Jump to this post

Thanks Jennifer. All that makes sense. I got out of whack somehow and my heart let me know it wasn't happy about it. Drinking an electrolyte drink right now.

Liked by Jennifer Hunter

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@catmom777

Thanks Jennifer. All that makes sense. I got out of whack somehow and my heart let me know it wasn't happy about it. Drinking an electrolyte drink right now.

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Plenty of other cheaper brands and flavors too, of gatorade…

Glad you can eliminate the elquis/xeralto as your dizzyness issue. Once past the mis-conception, you are on your way to feeling better! Yae!

Liked by catmom777

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It is easy to look up side effects of medications…and Eliquis symptoms include: quote: 'headache, dizziness, weakness, feeling like you might pass out.' One thing I have trained my kids to do since childhood, "Never put anything in your mouth without researching its effects completely."

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Eliquis, eliquis, eliquis…

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@afrobin

Eliquis, eliquis, eliquis…

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So I woke up at a little after 3 am with my heart going crazy. Hooked up to my BP monitor and my heart rate was 152. A few minutes later it dropped down to 81, then later went all the way up to 181. That's when I called RMSA. They stayed with me until it came down to fluctuations between 80 and 110. I didn't want to go to the ER. I knew what they'd do anyway. Nothing they could do but wait it out also. I"m picking up the drug that helps regulate heart rate today. I held off on it because of it might make my BP too low, but regulating my heart rate is now more imperative.

REPLY
@catmom777

So I woke up at a little after 3 am with my heart going crazy. Hooked up to my BP monitor and my heart rate was 152. A few minutes later it dropped down to 81, then later went all the way up to 181. That's when I called RMSA. They stayed with me until it came down to fluctuations between 80 and 110. I didn't want to go to the ER. I knew what they'd do anyway. Nothing they could do but wait it out also. I"m picking up the drug that helps regulate heart rate today. I held off on it because of it might make my BP too low, but regulating my heart rate is now more imperative.

Jump to this post

Last time I went to ER with this my BP mach and hospital finger pulse rate units could not read my fast afib. They found another pulse measure device they taped to my finger so they could see the afib and beats: constant 140-143bpm. They said anything over about 100 for long time should be trip to ER. Anyway, they tried 3 different chemicals in my IV over 1 hour, no change. Then they tried this last one, Cartia, and IMMEDIATELY it dropped to solid 80 – still Afibing around but at least it slowed. Took all of 1 second after they pushed it into IV. They sent me home with a prescription of it in pill form; next week my cardiologist when he did f-up visit said stop taking that stuff it is not needed. But I kept the bottle just in case… cartia xp cap 240/24hr. expensive @ $35 for 30.

What is a "RMSA?"

Liked by catmom777

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@catmom777

So I woke up at a little after 3 am with my heart going crazy. Hooked up to my BP monitor and my heart rate was 152. A few minutes later it dropped down to 81, then later went all the way up to 181. That's when I called RMSA. They stayed with me until it came down to fluctuations between 80 and 110. I didn't want to go to the ER. I knew what they'd do anyway. Nothing they could do but wait it out also. I"m picking up the drug that helps regulate heart rate today. I held off on it because of it might make my BP too low, but regulating my heart rate is now more imperative.

Jump to this post

@catmom777 You did the right thing to use your blood pressure monitor and call for help after your erratic heart rate. I understand not wanting to go to the emergency room, but if in doubt, you should go. Those could be symptoms of a heart attack to wake up with a crazy heart rate if you hadn't just had a nightmare. In a heart attack, part of the heart muscle dies weakening your heart. Don't take chances with your heart. I took myself to the emergency room one day when my resting heart rate was 120. It was a breathing problem caused by a chest full of phlegm due to an infection and my heart was compensating trying to deliver the oxygen my body needed.

If you haven't already, please see a cardiologist. You need to discuss your decisions about taking prescriptions. I know we all have concerns about bad effects from drugs, and it's good to ask questions about them, but a decision that you make on your own can be serious. Don't guess with your heart. You do need to figure out why you are having an electrolyte imbalance and if there is another disease behind that causing the issues that then affect your heart. The kidneys are part of the balance by excreting wastes and reabsorbing nutrients. My mom had some kidney problems and her potassium blood levels were very elevated which put her at increased risk of a heart attack, and for awhile, she had to eliminate potassium in her diet. She had an emergency treatment with something to bring down the critical potassium levels. Her kidneys eventually recovered and she is OK now. I think this happened as a result of the numerous pain medicines she was given in a long recovery after breaking her pelvis,ankle and foot. She had gone through a 3 month rehab stay and they were always dosing her with drugs, and I caught them overdosing her in the hospital and saw how it affected her breathing. She also developed slight jaundice because her liver wasn't happy after all that either.

My dad was a heart patient, and I saw what he went through and cared for him in end stage heart failure. He had an electrical problem where his heart did not correctly initiate the signals to coordinate his heart beat. He had afib, and I saw that on the monitors every time I was in the emergency room with him. He had a pacemaker/defibrillator that saved his life several times. I sent him to the emergency room many times when he didn't recognize the problem. He also had had a head injury years earlier and lost the ability of critical thinking and reasoning. He took a drug for the electrical heart problem. Eventually, he had an ablation to stop the erroneous signals from the heart node. He had a first heart attack at 50, then 2 years later, a quadruple bypass.

So please consult a cardiologist and discuss everything you take, supplements, prescription drugs that you take, and those that you are waiting to see if you need before taking them. Discuss your diet and if it is deficient in nutrients. The decisions about regulating blood pressure with medications and regulating heart rate should be made by a medical professional and as patients we should be an active participant in that discussion with our doctors.

Liked by catmom777

REPLY
@jenniferhunter

@catmom777 You did the right thing to use your blood pressure monitor and call for help after your erratic heart rate. I understand not wanting to go to the emergency room, but if in doubt, you should go. Those could be symptoms of a heart attack to wake up with a crazy heart rate if you hadn't just had a nightmare. In a heart attack, part of the heart muscle dies weakening your heart. Don't take chances with your heart. I took myself to the emergency room one day when my resting heart rate was 120. It was a breathing problem caused by a chest full of phlegm due to an infection and my heart was compensating trying to deliver the oxygen my body needed.

If you haven't already, please see a cardiologist. You need to discuss your decisions about taking prescriptions. I know we all have concerns about bad effects from drugs, and it's good to ask questions about them, but a decision that you make on your own can be serious. Don't guess with your heart. You do need to figure out why you are having an electrolyte imbalance and if there is another disease behind that causing the issues that then affect your heart. The kidneys are part of the balance by excreting wastes and reabsorbing nutrients. My mom had some kidney problems and her potassium blood levels were very elevated which put her at increased risk of a heart attack, and for awhile, she had to eliminate potassium in her diet. She had an emergency treatment with something to bring down the critical potassium levels. Her kidneys eventually recovered and she is OK now. I think this happened as a result of the numerous pain medicines she was given in a long recovery after breaking her pelvis,ankle and foot. She had gone through a 3 month rehab stay and they were always dosing her with drugs, and I caught them overdosing her in the hospital and saw how it affected her breathing. She also developed slight jaundice because her liver wasn't happy after all that either.

My dad was a heart patient, and I saw what he went through and cared for him in end stage heart failure. He had an electrical problem where his heart did not correctly initiate the signals to coordinate his heart beat. He had afib, and I saw that on the monitors every time I was in the emergency room with him. He had a pacemaker/defibrillator that saved his life several times. I sent him to the emergency room many times when he didn't recognize the problem. He also had had a head injury years earlier and lost the ability of critical thinking and reasoning. He took a drug for the electrical heart problem. Eventually, he had an ablation to stop the erroneous signals from the heart node. He had a first heart attack at 50, then 2 years later, a quadruple bypass.

So please consult a cardiologist and discuss everything you take, supplements, prescription drugs that you take, and those that you are waiting to see if you need before taking them. Discuss your diet and if it is deficient in nutrients. The decisions about regulating blood pressure with medications and regulating heart rate should be made by a medical professional and as patients we should be an active participant in that discussion with our doctors.

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The earliest I could get in to see a cardiologist is May 3rd. Long ways away. I asked my doc to send another referral to another doctor who might be able to get me in sooner.
I agree with you on all this. I had called my insurance plan helpline in the middle of the night a couple of weeks ago–did not want to go back to the ER AGAIN, and she said "You only have one heart." So I went. By the time I got there my heart had calmed down.
But, the EMTs put a cold pack behind my neck. That seemed to help. I have a cold pack and next time will try that. I still haven't rec'd the bills for my first ER visits so am extremely nervous about what these visits are going to cost me. I'm on Medicare, but I don't know how that works yet either as I just turned 65 last fall.
BTW, my potassium levels were fine. It was my sodium that was off last week, so now when I feel more off than usual I take some Himalayan salt crystals. I only get my afib attacks at night, which I think is because of sleep apnea. I will be following up on that with an ENT specialist and see if I can get into a sleep clinic. My sis told me to get a fitbit also, which will monitor my sleeping patterns. I'll be looking into that today.
But, thanks for all the information. The more informed I am about this condition, the better prepared I will be when I see the cardiologist.

Liked by Jennifer Hunter

REPLY
@yorlik

Last time I went to ER with this my BP mach and hospital finger pulse rate units could not read my fast afib. They found another pulse measure device they taped to my finger so they could see the afib and beats: constant 140-143bpm. They said anything over about 100 for long time should be trip to ER. Anyway, they tried 3 different chemicals in my IV over 1 hour, no change. Then they tried this last one, Cartia, and IMMEDIATELY it dropped to solid 80 – still Afibing around but at least it slowed. Took all of 1 second after they pushed it into IV. They sent me home with a prescription of it in pill form; next week my cardiologist when he did f-up visit said stop taking that stuff it is not needed. But I kept the bottle just in case… cartia xp cap 240/24hr. expensive @ $35 for 30.

What is a "RMSA?"

Jump to this post

RMSA is our emergency transport. They are great. All young people but so professional and courteous. Thanks for the info on Cardia. I'm picking up something today (can't remember name) that I'm nervous about because while it regulates the heart, it also lowers the BP. Mine at one point this week was 95/47. Usually it's between 110/60 and 120/70.

REPLY
@catmom777

The earliest I could get in to see a cardiologist is May 3rd. Long ways away. I asked my doc to send another referral to another doctor who might be able to get me in sooner.
I agree with you on all this. I had called my insurance plan helpline in the middle of the night a couple of weeks ago–did not want to go back to the ER AGAIN, and she said "You only have one heart." So I went. By the time I got there my heart had calmed down.
But, the EMTs put a cold pack behind my neck. That seemed to help. I have a cold pack and next time will try that. I still haven't rec'd the bills for my first ER visits so am extremely nervous about what these visits are going to cost me. I'm on Medicare, but I don't know how that works yet either as I just turned 65 last fall.
BTW, my potassium levels were fine. It was my sodium that was off last week, so now when I feel more off than usual I take some Himalayan salt crystals. I only get my afib attacks at night, which I think is because of sleep apnea. I will be following up on that with an ENT specialist and see if I can get into a sleep clinic. My sis told me to get a fitbit also, which will monitor my sleeping patterns. I'll be looking into that today.
But, thanks for all the information. The more informed I am about this condition, the better prepared I will be when I see the cardiologist.

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@catmom777 Call Medicare and ask about billing. My mom is in on Medicare and also has a supplement insurance plan, and a prescription plan, so that pays everything with her medical bills. Medicare providers have to accept the rates that Medicare sets, and I don't think they are allowed to bill the patient. If there was anything else, the Bluecross plan picks it up. Medicare can answer.

Sleep apnea can be a big part of the issues and can contribute to heart disease, so I think you are right linking that to afib. You'll feel a lot better after you address that. A friend of mine had some anxiety being caused by sleep apnea because she was always in fight or flight mode all night when she stopped breathing. She said getting a CPAP machine made a huge difference. She had gone through a hospitalization when they had trouble figuring out what was wrong. Would it help to sleep only half reclined in a recliner until you can get to the cardiologist? It might keep your throat from closing off if you are not laying flat. That's a guess. I don't have sleep apnea.

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