Is anyone here addicted to the internet?

Posted by usernameca @usernameca, Sep 9, 2019

I came to the conclusion years ago that I was, but I just brushed it off because I had been diagnosed (and take medications for) with Severe Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. But now I can see that it’s because I have been diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome (which I actually don’t think I have), but I think I have “plain” autism. That’s often considered worse than having Asperger’s. Anyway, a symptom of both of these can be a severe obsession with one thing. For me, that one thing is probably the internet. I figure that I’ve been on it for 25 years now, probably at least 350 days-a-year. and anywhere from 2 to 16 hours-a-day! why? Because I’m convinced that somehow, some way, I’ll figure out a way to “earn a living” online working from home. Hah! I doubt that any human being has ever done that, and that includes Bill Gates, Mark zuckerberg, and Jeff Bezos!

@usernameca
Hi,

I don’t have an addiction but am curious if anyone has suggested seeking help from a mental health professional to see if there are any other underlying causes. You recognize that there is a problem so that’s a big step forward. I am also curious as to what you do during the day when you are on the internet only 2 hours. Do you eat regularly, sleep well, have any physical ailments, live alone, how old are you?, any interaction with people outside your home? Any reason you can’t work outside the home? Do you live in a rural area or metropolitan area? Source of income? Are you incapacitated in any way?
These are questions a mental health professional would ask. Everyone is an internet user to some degree (out of necessity or as entertainment).
Am interested to see if how many others are in your situation.
Why did you choose to post to the Mayo forum? Sounds like you want help.

Regards from FL Mary

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Hi, @usernameca – you've brought up an important topic here, potential internet addiction, which I think is more widespread than many may imagine. 350 days-a-year. and anywhere from 2 to 16 hours-a-day is indeed quite a bit of time on the internet, yet you don't seem to feel that what you are looking for — an online job — is likely to bear out for you.

In addition to the great comments and questions that @imallears posted, I'm hoping that @stressedmesseddepressed will also join this discussion about being addicted to the internet. I'd also like to invite into this discussion @angelinaprinzivalli @lorena1egas @wellandhappy!. Since you mentioned being somewhere on the autism spectrum, I also wanted to ask @mamacita and @sirgalahad to join the conversation.

Have you seen any results with your search for an online position thus far?

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Good evening, @usernameca and @lisalucier, Let me start by directing attention to this research by a reliable source.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3480687/ .

It appears that the early findings were gathered from non-work related online use rather than from working online use and the psychiatric organization involved still introduced the word "addiction" to describe what they felt was impulsive or obsessive behavior. If I read this correctly you @usernamea are seeking online employment and wondering if you will have to confront elements of addiction.

In my opinion, the internet is a part of the march of technology into and through our lives. What was normal in 1996 when the first research inquiries were made, is not viable today. I am sure a large percentage of our citizenry sit in front of a computer screen for much of their day. What are they risking? I for one, have dry eye syndrome, in part brought on by spending too much time on a digital device. I do enjoy the accessibility of knowledge on any subject that can entrance me for hours.

We see the rather poignant visuals of young folks in 1997 walking in the park and talking with each other. Today's images show them looking at their phones often with their backs to their friends. Is their behavior abnormal, concerning, anti-social or just in line with our "internet" world? So..let's hope we can glean more and more from current research.

For me, the answer is quite simple, interacting with "my devices" serves as a viable distraction from pain. At one time, I think I spent too much money on those in-app purchases when my neuropathy was a new issue and I was extremely confused and frightened. Gaming and researching were escapes from the reality of discomfort. Now that I understand my medical status better and have found some solutions that give me staying power, I spend a lot less money and a lot fewer hours on games. On the other hand, I do enjoy my time on Connect and besides, it justifies what we can now call a worthwhile and beneficial addiction to technology. Have a restful sleep. Chris

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@usernameca, actually, it is indeed possible to work from home using the internet. I turned down two jobs because it just wasn't a good fit for me. Two friends work from home and do very well.

Everyday Aspergers, by Samantha Craft. Spectrum Suite.org. Actually Autistic here. I "passed" for years. If feels really good to just be myself. Another connection I would recommend to you is Supporty McGroupface on Facebook. It's going to be ok.

Mamacita Jane

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@usernameca I am autistic, diagnosed with Aspergers. I use the internet as an easier way to connect with people, especially now that we live in a rural setting. I have cyber-friends all over, who I would never have otherwise. The internet is part of our world today, and while it is useful for so many things, it can be a great time-waster. It can be an excuse to not do everyday chores or big projects. How do you see your usage of the internet? As a resource for information or as a way to pass the time?
Ginger

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HI, @usernameca – you'd mentioned last month that you came to the conclusion years ago that you were addicted to the internet. Wanted to check in with you and see how you are feeling about your internet use lately?

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@mamacita

@usernameca, actually, it is indeed possible to work from home using the internet. I turned down two jobs because it just wasn't a good fit for me. Two friends work from home and do very well.

Everyday Aspergers, by Samantha Craft. Spectrum Suite.org. Actually Autistic here. I "passed" for years. If feels really good to just be myself. Another connection I would recommend to you is Supporty McGroupface on Facebook. It's going to be ok.

Mamacita Jane

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You turned down 2 jobs that you could have done from home? Can I ask what jobs they were? Thanks.

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@lisalucier

HI, @usernameca – you'd mentioned last month that you came to the conclusion years ago that you were addicted to the internet. Wanted to check in with you and see how you are feeling about your internet use lately?

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Nothing has changed. I'm trying to teach myself programming languages. People with Autism may become "addicted" to the internet for financial reasons. They know that if their money ever runs out, they are in BIG trouble unless they can create a job. Applying for jobs doesn't work very well for some people with Autism.

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@sofaramnotdead

Nothing has changed. I'm trying to teach myself programming languages. People with Autism may become "addicted" to the internet for financial reasons. They know that if their money ever runs out, they are in BIG trouble unless they can create a job. Applying for jobs doesn't work very well for some people with Autism.

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Hi, @sofaramnotdead – thinking of you and wondering how you are doing? How's it going with learning some programming languages?

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Hi, @sundance6 @jddart @bettyann @kenny48 @jimhd. @usenameca brought up the idea that they are possibly addicted to the internet. I realized that I might know someone, the husband of an old friend, who has had this struggle since it eventually came out that he had a porn addiction, fueled by viewing internet porn. I realize that looking at porn is not the only thing that someone addicted to the internet might be doing online and it can come in many forms — you can be endlessly looking for a job, looking at Facebook, playing games, looking for old classmates. etc., with your usage increasing and other priorities taking a backseat.

Here are a couple of relevant Mayo Clinic articles. Though they are addressing an internet/tech/online gaming issue in children and teens, the articles provide useful information for adults, too.

– On curbing a teen's tech addiction https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/discussion/mayo-clinic-minute-curbing-your-teens-tech-addiction/

– Tips for if you believe your child is addicted to gaming https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/discussion/mayo-clinic-minute-3-tips-on-what-to-do-if-your-child-is-addicted-to-gaming/

Wondering if you've heard of cases of internet addiction or know of anyone who's gotten themselves out of a potential internet addiction?

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My husband is earning a living by teaching on line.
Video conferencing, papers submitted by computer.
The university is closed. (Social distancing)

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@helenfrances

My husband is earning a living by teaching on line.
Video conferencing, papers submitted by computer.
The university is closed. (Social distancing)

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Seems to me that he is addicted BUT he is working from home😷

Liked by lioness

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I'm an author and the Internet is where most people go to buy books. My publisher wants authors to use social media to spread the word about their books. I''m on Facebook every day.

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Not an addiction , but I socialize far more on the net. It is easier and keeps me less isolated. Quirks, tics and eye contact are not required for non-vid voip. Even long pauses and sudden stepping away are not unforgiveable breaches in your netiquette. Conversation voice-overs are taken less harshly. But on other hand people are less filtered and can irritate you easier. Fewer expectations for "normalcies". You have to be extraordinarily combative or rude to make every person present in the channel to block you. I miss friends I go to tea with but can vid call to do that in a sterile way.
FB is cesspool, I stopped being on it daily after 2014 but periodically check for the last generation unable to learn new platform therefore trapped there. Soon as it's replacement arrives I shall move completely. Just like I did before with BBCode> AOL>Myspace>Tribes>FB >Discord

I have many OCD habits that can loop an activity for unusual amount of time but actual addictions… Like thrill-seeking, gambling, smoking or imbibing foreign substances incl alcohol. The closest would be chocolate? The other would be geneaology research. Can't say games since after I have finished one I rarely go back, Minecraft & SimCity type games could result in unhealthy amount of time at keyboard but they also are put aside when I have to do some adulting.
Honestly, it would technically be dairy consumption since I'm allergic but eat/drink it anyway despite dark circles and rough skin punishments and other adverse results and the cognition that I should NOT eat much or any.

My son also does not seem to have an addictive physique. He is modest in game/pc tiime, moderate in his drawing time. He has bad habit of picking any unsmooth areas of his face to point of being horror movie extra (started first time with a mystery rash brought home from school but now every stiff hair, pimple, sunbump, rash, scratch is target), but the loop stops as soon as the skin is smooth. He is not addicted to the pain or action of ripping. THANK God!.

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@sofaramnotdead

You turned down 2 jobs that you could have done from home? Can I ask what jobs they were? Thanks.

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@sofaramnotdead , working for a local counseling center. Making appointments for seminars. Dealing with the public.

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