Treating Osteoporosis

Posted by heritage1955 @heritage1955, Apr 1, 2016

Hi. I'm new to the site and am interested in treating osteoperosis. I'm 39 yo and recently had a bone density that showed I'm at -2.4. So, going through the intial "I can't believe it" stuff. 🙂

Interested in more discussions like this? Go to the Bones, Joints & Muscles group.

@colleenyoung

Welcome to Connect @blythe.
Thank you for sharing your experience with Atelvia (risedronate). Please keep us posted on the results on the bone scan.

I thought you and the others sharing on this thread might be interested in this article by Kurt A. Kennel, M.D., a specialist in endocrinology at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. In this article, he answers common questions about osteoporosis treatment and describes how osteoporosis medications work. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/osteoporosis/in-depth/osteoporosis-treatment/art-20046869?pg=1

Are you concerned about lowering your calcium intake?

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So happy to hear from you and what you said, made me feel better. I was told I can only be on altevia for 3 years
What do I do then, good article someone sent that it stays in the bone even after stopping it. I like the delayed
release because you take it after breakfast and then stay upright for 30 minutes.

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@angelas

I, too, am interested in treatments for osteoporosis at a younger (50) age; however, postmenopausal. I found Dr. Lani’s Bone Health Guide book helpful. I’m wary of beginning medical treatments (Forteo for 18-24 months and then a bisphosphonate for 5-7 years) based on one BMD scan.

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So Happy to read your post. I have a Fiend who is on Reclast has been for 2 years. So you did gain bone density
and have a way to keep what you gained. I will pas this on to her. Now I will hope that Altevia does it for me and
then after my 3 years I can do something to keep it. thanks again blythe

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@angelas

I, too, am interested in treatments for osteoporosis at a younger (50) age; however, postmenopausal. I found Dr. Lani’s Bone Health Guide book helpful. I’m wary of beginning medical treatments (Forteo for 18-24 months and then a bisphosphonate for 5-7 years) based on one BMD scan.

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I just pulled out the few records I have, & in 2009-2010 my T-score was
-2.6 for my left hip. At that time I was using Miacalcin Nasal Spray as an
alternative to Fosamax, etc. I continued using it until 2013 when I
started the Reclast infusions. My 2015 bone density was -2.5 in the left
hip. My spine bone density was up to -1.4. So, the increase in my left
hip was moderate, but headed in the right direction. The increase in my
spine BMD was more dramatic. I don’t have my previous spinal readings, but
my internist was quite pleased with the increase. I will start Prolia in
December or January. I hope you & your friend have positive results with
your treatments. I have recently increased my vitamin D dose to 4000 I.U.
a day. (1000 I.U. in my Calcium Citrate + D tablets plus 3x1000I.U.
capsules). If I exercised regularly, I would probably see better results.

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@angelas

I, too, am interested in treatments for osteoporosis at a younger (50) age; however, postmenopausal. I found Dr. Lani’s Bone Health Guide book helpful. I’m wary of beginning medical treatments (Forteo for 18-24 months and then a bisphosphonate for 5-7 years) based on one BMD scan.

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What great news @arthritichands. Thanks for sharing it.
I bet @lesleighjarrett would appreciate hearing about your experience with the Miacalcin Nasal Spray in particular. She was inquiring about it on this thread https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/calcitoinin-salmon-nasal-spray-for-osteoporosis/

You must be pleased with the results. And remember regular exercise doesn’t have to be of olympic quality. Every little bit helps.
I love this YouTube video from Dr. Mike Evans called “Let’s Make our Day Harder” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=whPuRLil4c0 It talks about the little things we can do in our daily habits to keep us moving. I especially like his reference to the parking spot further from the door reserved for those of us who want to live a little longer. I hope you like it too.

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@angelas

I, too, am interested in treatments for osteoporosis at a younger (50) age; however, postmenopausal. I found Dr. Lani’s Bone Health Guide book helpful. I’m wary of beginning medical treatments (Forteo for 18-24 months and then a bisphosphonate for 5-7 years) based on one BMD scan.

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Sounds like you are going down the right road, happy for you. I have 2 more years to go on Altevia so looks like I can then use something else. I would like to try the Reclast. Thanks for the info

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I am new to the group.
An intro: I am almost 71 and have osteoporosis, Parkinson’s (presumed Agent Orange – I am in that group), hypoglycemia and a few other conditions but consider myself relatively healthy. PMA. I actually worry more short term about the osteo as that could make a major life change suddenly as opposed to the long-term PD. I have been on Fosamax and calcium for 4 years or so and score 2.5 lumbar, 1.8 necks and 1.1 femurs. I do 2 miles on the treadmill and weight machines 3 days a week. My dad had bad bones too, but never broke one so I am “cautiously optimistic” but concerned about long-term Fosamax use.

.

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Hi – I have had 6 breaks in my lifetime. I am 76. I am on Actonel once a week and do endurance weight classes. So far, my osteoporosis has never advanced and I am told to continue with what I am doing. I guess whatever works. I also have a lung disease that cannot be cured (IPF) but I am still functioning rather well without all the medication they want to give me.

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Hi @ggopher, and welcome to the Osteoporosis discussion! I’m glad you joined this conversation. @susandockter, @jmbjar and @mohavegal as well as other members participating, please join me in welcoming @ggopher to the group.

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@ggopher

I am new to the group.
An intro: I am almost 71 and have osteoporosis, Parkinson’s (presumed Agent Orange – I am in that group), hypoglycemia and a few other conditions but consider myself relatively healthy. PMA. I actually worry more short term about the osteo as that could make a major life change suddenly as opposed to the long-term PD. I have been on Fosamax and calcium for 4 years or so and score 2.5 lumbar, 1.8 necks and 1.1 femurs. I do 2 miles on the treadmill and weight machines 3 days a week. My dad had bad bones too, but never broke one so I am “cautiously optimistic” but concerned about long-term Fosamax use.

.

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@ggopher, welcome to the group and thanks for laying out your concerns in clear detail. I was poked by your mention of “long-term Fosamax use,” which faced my wife until two years ago after several years of Fosamax use for osteopenia. Her primary physician agreed to drop Fosamax after the FDA raised public warnings about several possible side-effects. Here is a link to an FDA publication in December 2013: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/DrugSafety/UCM241519.pdf.

My wife’s doctor was impressed by the FDA finding that growth of new bone is stunted after several years of Fosamax treatment, possibly leading to fractures. Her calcium supplements (with Vitamin D) have continued to this day, and her heavy physical workout regimen stopped her osteopenia in its tracks. It may have done the same for you!

Can you keep us posted on your progress in managing your situation? It would be most helpful to us all.

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@ggopher

I am new to the group.
An intro: I am almost 71 and have osteoporosis, Parkinson’s (presumed Agent Orange – I am in that group), hypoglycemia and a few other conditions but consider myself relatively healthy. PMA. I actually worry more short term about the osteo as that could make a major life change suddenly as opposed to the long-term PD. I have been on Fosamax and calcium for 4 years or so and score 2.5 lumbar, 1.8 necks and 1.1 femurs. I do 2 miles on the treadmill and weight machines 3 days a week. My dad had bad bones too, but never broke one so I am “cautiously optimistic” but concerned about long-term Fosamax use.

.

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Hi Ggopher! Welcome to the group! There are lots of ideas and perspectives here. You can get a lot of information to research and take back to your Dr’s. I am surprised by your being on fosamax for so long when it seems like your bones are not that far along the path to being strong. Are those numbers from a recent scan? My mom was in a similar situation with both Parkinson’s and osteoporosis and unfortunately fell doing normal light house work, broke her hip, and never walked again. Definitely your weight lifting and exercise will help your balance to keep you from falling, but from what I understand as a patient, may not be enough. Parkinson’s and balance are definitely issues that go together. Maybe the info in this group will help you evaluate your situation and ask new questions that might give you more options. We each are so different! Keep us posted and good luck.

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@ggopher

I am new to the group.
An intro: I am almost 71 and have osteoporosis, Parkinson’s (presumed Agent Orange – I am in that group), hypoglycemia and a few other conditions but consider myself relatively healthy. PMA. I actually worry more short term about the osteo as that could make a major life change suddenly as opposed to the long-term PD. I have been on Fosamax and calcium for 4 years or so and score 2.5 lumbar, 1.8 necks and 1.1 femurs. I do 2 miles on the treadmill and weight machines 3 days a week. My dad had bad bones too, but never broke one so I am “cautiously optimistic” but concerned about long-term Fosamax use.

.

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I have my next Dr (well, PA) appt in a couple weeks and I think it is time for my next bone scan so I’ll see my new scores and let y’all know. I’ll bring up the Fosamax issue because I had heard the same about side effects. Last scan was 12_18 months ago. Balance is still good but not great and a concern for the future so I stay off ladders and the like. How heavy a workout regimen for your wife? My PA told me to stay at 10 pounds but I can’t see that helping so I do 30 reps of 30# and up depending on the joint/muscle group but I don’t strain at all, just go for reps.

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@ggopher

I am new to the group.
An intro: I am almost 71 and have osteoporosis, Parkinson’s (presumed Agent Orange – I am in that group), hypoglycemia and a few other conditions but consider myself relatively healthy. PMA. I actually worry more short term about the osteo as that could make a major life change suddenly as opposed to the long-term PD. I have been on Fosamax and calcium for 4 years or so and score 2.5 lumbar, 1.8 necks and 1.1 femurs. I do 2 miles on the treadmill and weight machines 3 days a week. My dad had bad bones too, but never broke one so I am “cautiously optimistic” but concerned about long-term Fosamax use.

.

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@ggopher, I guess I used the wrong adjective when I wrote of my wife’s “heavy” physical workout regimen. Maybe I should have called it “rigorous” or “habitual!” She’s in our home gym every morning about 5:30 for an hour at least. Main equipment she uses are treadmill, cycle, and universal exercise machine which she uses to pull 15 pounds per arm and 25 pounds per leg. As you know from your own regimen, it’s great for extending her days. Just read a newspaper article that gives physical workouts high marks for lifting mood and outlook and overcomes ADHD habits! All of that and rebuilding bones too! Such a deal!

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