Heart Problems, Cardiac Symptoms, But Test Results Normal

Posted by deepakkumar @deepakkumar, Apr 11, 2019

m heart rate had go to very fast last night at 3.00 am about 120 to 130 per minutes, when i change position and go to outdoor slowly and return to bedroom, it become normal and I sleep again. Again when i weak up in morning, again heart rate is about 110 to 120. This type of happen three times in 5 months . I tested for ECG, EcoCG,EEG, Ions, CBC,BP and DC. all are normal. Also sometime when i am in standing or sitting, a sudden cardiac arrest type of event occur and I have faint, sweeting.

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@afrobin

I read some time ago to sleep on the left side and it works for me. It could be an individual thing.

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I'm sure it may well be.

Much variability in medicine. I suffered with leg pain, took OTC stuff, nothing. Go to the Dr., he prescribes Orudis (Ketoprofen), I'm thinking it's close to Ibuprofen, it isn't going to work. Within a day, pain was gone (Unfortunately so is Orudis, it went OTC and was later no longer marketed OTC in the U.S., but supposedly available by prescription). Ugh.

Best regards.

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@deepakkumar

feeling sudden heart jumping in center of chest only for few seconds like 3 to 6 second , occurs at any time and minimum 1 episode in between 1 to 3 month , fear occur at that time. small fatigue also occur. ECG , EcoCG, EEG, Ions, CBC, BP, DC, Thyroid are normal . No family history of heart problems. Still it is undiagnosed. when ever it occur, i try to understand it, but due to insufficient of time of occurrence, i can't able to understand it. what is it ? Also i do regular exercise. and it occurs from 2 years and my age is 21. my height is 170 cm and weight is 50 kg.

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Also the condition much look like PVC (premature ventricular contraction ) . am I right ?

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@deepakkumar

feeling sudden heart jumping in center of chest only for few seconds like 3 to 6 second , occurs at any time and minimum 1 episode in between 1 to 3 month , fear occur at that time. small fatigue also occur. ECG , EcoCG, EEG, Ions, CBC, BP, DC, Thyroid are normal . No family history of heart problems. Still it is undiagnosed. when ever it occur, i try to understand it, but due to insufficient of time of occurrence, i can't able to understand it. what is it ? Also i do regular exercise. and it occurs from 2 years and my age is 21. my height is 170 cm and weight is 50 kg.

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How to differentiate SVT from Sinus Tachycardia without ECG ?

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@deepakkumar

How to differentiate SVT from Sinus Tachycardia without ECG ?

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The heart has 4 chambers, two in the Atrium, two in the Ventricles. Heart cells respond to the minuscule electrical signal generated by certain specialized cells, but, unfortunately, those heart cells that typically respond to that electrical stimulus can also generate electrical signals themselves, causing the heart muscle to contract at an inappropriate time.

The normal electrical signals generated by the specialized cells to cause the heart to beat are located in the Atrium and is known as the SA (Sino-Atrial) Node. From there are fibers that travel to the other side of the Atrium to carry the electrical signal and there are fibers that travel down towards the Ventricles, actually going to the AV (Atrio-Ventricular) Node.

The AV Node is a merciful design, it's the reason that those of us with Afib aren't more impacted by it than we are. The AV Node acts to limit the rate that the Atrial Signals are conducted to the Ventricles. Afib can produce very high Atrial Rates, something like 300 Beats Per Minute, but the AV Node limits how many of those Atrial Signals get through.

But, normal signals start in the SA Node, travel to the other chamber of the Atrium. From the SA Node the signal also travel to the AV Node. From the AV Node the Signal Travels to the Ventricles, conducting cells distributing the signals to both chambers of the Ventricles.

SVT – Supra Ventricular Tachycardia (Supra means above) is a Tachycardia that results from a source above the Ventricles, as does the normal heart beat, but Tachycardia usually refers to a rate above 100 Beats Per Minute.

So, with that in mind are these definitions from an online source:

""• Sinus tachycardia
Normal sinus tachycardia. Sinus tachycardia is present when a person's heart rate is over 100 beats per minute. This is normal if there is a clear reason for the fast heart rate, such as exercise, pain, or fever. With sinus tachycardia, the electrical system of the heart is working normally.

• Abnormal (inappropriate) sinus tachycardia. Sinus tachycardia (heart rate over 100 beats per minute) is not normal if there is no apparent cause. In this rare condition, the electrical system of the heart is working normally.

• People with inappropriate sinus tachycardia typically don't have any heart disease. Inappropriate sinus tachycardia with no heart disease may mean your autonomic nervous system isn't working right.""

Sinus Tachycardia is a form of SVT, as it originates in the top of the heart, above the Ventricles.

Actually, after I wrote this, but still researching, I found this Mayo Page:
https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/supraventricular-tachycardia/symptoms-causes/syc-20355243
In part, it also covered this:

""Other types of supraventricular tachycardia include:

Sinus tachycardia""

If you have inappropriate tachycardia, times that your heart goes above 100 without reason, be sure to see your doctor. There are multiple reasons for Inappropriate Tachycardia, they should be evaluated and treated as needed.

Tachycardia can also be limited to the Ventricles, that's why I mentioned that cells can discharge on their own and cause other cells to beat. Sustained Ventricular Tachycardia (source of the fast rate is on the ventricles) can be life threatening and would require immediate emergency care. NSVT, Non-Sustaining Ventricular Tachycardia, my Cardiologist said even in healthy individuals, even college age ones, an occasional short episode has been recorded during studies. Nevertheless, it pays to consult your doctor for any irregular rhythm episodes until they can be recorded and diagnosed.

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As of a few weeks ago, I have constant sinus tachycardia mostly up to 120-125 BPM and occasionally down to 50-85 BPM.
Calling my cardiologist, he told me to the ER which I did. They monitored me for three hours, determining I didn't have AFIB (an intermittent problem for which I take blood thinners).

Blood work and chest Xrays were normal, so the ER doctor discharged me determining it wasn't necessary to hold me overnight and advising me to consult with my cardiologist. To my surprise, the cardiologist said it wasn't necessary to move my next appointment (May) up. He even said I could return to working out in the gym.

The sinus tachycardia is continuing even when I am resting as it's been going on the whole time. I read online that these symptoms translate to "inappropriate sinus tachycardia". which is abnormal and requires attention. I don't know what to do! I feel fine except for occasional slight breathlessness. There aren't many cardiologist in my rural setting (poorly medically served).

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@realitytest

As of a few weeks ago, I have constant sinus tachycardia mostly up to 120-125 BPM and occasionally down to 50-85 BPM.
Calling my cardiologist, he told me to the ER which I did. They monitored me for three hours, determining I didn't have AFIB (an intermittent problem for which I take blood thinners).

Blood work and chest Xrays were normal, so the ER doctor discharged me determining it wasn't necessary to hold me overnight and advising me to consult with my cardiologist. To my surprise, the cardiologist said it wasn't necessary to move my next appointment (May) up. He even said I could return to working out in the gym.

The sinus tachycardia is continuing even when I am resting as it's been going on the whole time. I read online that these symptoms translate to "inappropriate sinus tachycardia". which is abnormal and requires attention. I don't know what to do! I feel fine except for occasional slight breathlessness. There aren't many cardiologist in my rural setting (poorly medically served).

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In the ER, was your heart rate elevated to around 120-5? Are you on a beta blocker or diltiazem already?

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I ended up in er put there by myself after strong palpitations and slight breathlessness.. weakness
all normal like you..On my own bp machine get readings like you
Had two ablations already

Maybe a third or pacemaker suggested..don't know what to do myself.
How does one figure out any of this? depressing me.

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@windyshores

In the ER, was your heart rate elevated to around 120-5? Are you on a beta blocker or diltiazem already?

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No, mostly only 100 – 110 (at most).

No, I'm not taking any cardiac meds apart from Xarelto.

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@realitytest

No, mostly only 100 – 110 (at most).

No, I'm not taking any cardiac meds apart from Xarelto.

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My guess is that concern was not enough at that rate to initiate treatment for tachycardia but I don't know the facts. I think comfort should be considered a factor.

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@realitytest

No, mostly only 100 – 110 (at most).

No, I'm not taking any cardiac meds apart from Xarelto.

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I often see Xarelto and other anticoagulation meds referred to as "cardiac meds." My Afib team has told me these meds are not cardiac meds, since they offer little if any therapy to the heart. Their effects are felt wherever your blood flows — in my case causing slight bleeds wherever a sore opens, usually in my internal and external epithelium (skin or internal organ lining such as of the bladder). That's why they're often referred to as "blood thinners," which may be slightly off-kilter also.

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Anticoagulants are used to address the risk of blood clots from atrial fibrillation. They do not address the afib itself: there are other medications for that. There may be other reasons for anticoagulants as well. The only one I know of is VDT, deep vein thrombosis. So yes they are not just for heart issues.

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Well, here I am with my pulse still (mostly) in sinus tachycardia and up to 135. Understood that I am at rest when these measures are recorded. Unlike when I. was in the ER, they can't tell if these abnormal rates are accompanied by AFIB.

Still my doctor doesn't think he needs to see me before (our already scheduled appointment in) May.

Even his nurses I'm dealing with are aghast.

Today at least I got him to agree to order me a cardiac "event monitor" for a week's use. This is one instance when my usually helpful googling isn't helping as I plainly see this symptom could signal a situation requiring intervention (for instance ablation).
Sample diagnoses: Sick Sinus Syndrome, inappropriate sinus tachycardia, "tachy-brady syndrome" (this one fits as my pulse also drops as low as 50). Also, my pulse becomes more elevated from only slight exercise, such as going up one flight of stairs at home. I also become slightly breathless then which didn't used to happen.

I see my pulse is 63 now – I can check for AFIB with my Apple watch. Oh, lord! It began at a normal rhythm, then kept randomly skipping beats, but my Apple Watch said sinus rhythm. I think that app isn't working which just makes everything that much harder to cope with.

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