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suemer
@suemer

Posts: 36
Joined: Aug 04, 2018

Gastroparesis diet - a lot out there but nothing consistent

Posted by @suemer, Sat, Sep 8 8:08am

Could someone tell me where to go to find a reliable and doctor-approved gastroparesis diet – what to eat and not eat. I have it and now my 51 year old son has it too. Or where is it on the Mayo clinic site?

Liked by pdilly

REPLY

Dr Joseph Murray, Mayo Mn

Is he a physician? I am just in need of the diet so I'm not quite sure I understand. Sorry

Thank you @suemer for posting your question. I recently started a conversation here called “Gastroparesis Diet Questions” and received wonderful replies about what other people do. But I don’t know if I can do that!

To see the G diet on the Mayo site just search gastroparesis. It’s helpful but not clear to me. I wish Mayo would expand their Gastroparesis diet page to clearly state what to eat and what not to eat.

@suemer You might want to look through the conversation pdilly was speaking of: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/gastroparesis-diet-questions/ . I personally think it is different for everyone. Well cooked vegetables and very tender meats are a must for me. I can eat brussell sprouts and creamed spinach if cooked tender.. cabbage and other greens I cannot seem to find a way to eat. Most breads I cannot handle nor regular potatoes unless the potatoes are mashed and soupy. I also have achalasia… which makes it difficult to swallow some things. Small meals are also a must for me. I had to have gastric bypass to fix a paraesophageal (sliding) hernia. Even after 4 years my stomach has not expanded.. it is about the size of a large egg. I can only eat a cup or so of food at a time. So important I get my stomach to empty. Walks are very helpful and when my stomach is very stubborn massages and even sometimes the heating pad are helpful when pain comes from lack of food moving.

Thank you for your reply @fourof5zs. It looks like you try things and see what works and what doesn’t and then move on — I wish I could be that way!
I’m still looking for that comprehensive list that says EAT THIS/DON’T EAT THIS.

This is a copy of info straight from the Mayo Gastroparesis pages:
“Eat well-cooked fruits and vegetables rather than raw fruits and vegetables
Avoid fibrous fruits and vegetables, such as oranges and broccoli, which may cause bezoars”

To me that is saying I can’t eat fibrous fruits and vegetables even if they are well-cooked. Is that correct?
If so, where can I get a list of fruits and vegetables that are “fibrous”?

I’m hoping a Mayo moderator might get involved and ask the Mayo experts to clarify.

@pdilly

Thank you for your reply @fourof5zs. It looks like you try things and see what works and what doesn’t and then move on — I wish I could be that way!
I’m still looking for that comprehensive list that says EAT THIS/DON’T EAT THIS.

This is a copy of info straight from the Mayo Gastroparesis pages:
“Eat well-cooked fruits and vegetables rather than raw fruits and vegetables
Avoid fibrous fruits and vegetables, such as oranges and broccoli, which may cause bezoars”

To me that is saying I can’t eat fibrous fruits and vegetables even if they are well-cooked. Is that correct?
If so, where can I get a list of fruits and vegetables that are “fibrous”?

I’m hoping a Mayo moderator might get involved and ask the Mayo experts to clarify.

Jump to this post

@pdilly Even though the human body is basically the same in everyone there are still differences. So therefore what works for one person may not work for another. Fibrous foods are those that are high in fiber. High fiber foods take longer to digest and if they sit in the stomach too long can cause a bezoar.. the food becomes hard like a rock and will go nowhere. I have only had a small one.

Some people can handle raw fruit without the skin and a baked potaoto without the skin. I cannot. I have a swallowing problem too, so I have to have more easy to swallow foods. Greens such as turnip, collard and mustard that I grew up with here in Georgia I cannot eat. I can eat broccolli florets if cooked tender, but not the stem. I can eat creamed spinach that my husband cooks. He usually uses the frozen spinach and it has no stems. I can eat quick oatmeal, but it tends to take me a while to eat it and it takes a while to digest… so I rarely eat it. My husband is our cook and he makes a granola bar that I can eat ( it has toasted oatmeal and it is a soft, chewy bar). He chops up almonds and assorted dried fruit small for it. It is filling an nutritious, but does not sit in my stomach forever like a lot of high fiber foods. High fiber food will take more time to digest than low fiber foods. Fruit such as apples and pears lose a lot of fiber once peeled and cooked… or canned. I can eat canned pineapple fine.. even with its texture. It actually make my stomach feel pretty good. Itt is my supper mixed with cottage cheese.

I also have diverticulosis and need a high fiber diet for that.. so diet is a big problem for me. Gastroparesis is better if you eat lower fiber diet and the diverticulosis requires high fiber. Hitting a medium is not easy. Early last year I had a severe bout of diverticulitis. I eat a lot of green peas and carrots cooked tender. Green beans I do not do well with nor do I do well with black-eyed or any variety that is what we call a field pea. I can eat a few canned baked beans.. even some canned kidney bean in chili (mine has to be bland though☹️) Ground beef is the most easily digested meat for me. I have a hard time with chicken and pork.

It would be hard for the Mayo Clinic to name all fibrous foods, but yes, it might be a good idea to give a few examples. In the search bar of your browser type in: list of fibrous foods; and you should get some results.

@fourof5zs

@pdilly Even though the human body is basically the same in everyone there are still differences. So therefore what works for one person may not work for another. Fibrous foods are those that are high in fiber. High fiber foods take longer to digest and if they sit in the stomach too long can cause a bezoar.. the food becomes hard like a rock and will go nowhere. I have only had a small one.

Some people can handle raw fruit without the skin and a baked potaoto without the skin. I cannot. I have a swallowing problem too, so I have to have more easy to swallow foods. Greens such as turnip, collard and mustard that I grew up with here in Georgia I cannot eat. I can eat broccolli florets if cooked tender, but not the stem. I can eat creamed spinach that my husband cooks. He usually uses the frozen spinach and it has no stems. I can eat quick oatmeal, but it tends to take me a while to eat it and it takes a while to digest… so I rarely eat it. My husband is our cook and he makes a granola bar that I can eat ( it has toasted oatmeal and it is a soft, chewy bar). He chops up almonds and assorted dried fruit small for it. It is filling an nutritious, but does not sit in my stomach forever like a lot of high fiber foods. High fiber food will take more time to digest than low fiber foods. Fruit such as apples and pears lose a lot of fiber once peeled and cooked… or canned. I can eat canned pineapple fine.. even with its texture. It actually make my stomach feel pretty good. Itt is my supper mixed with cottage cheese.

I also have diverticulosis and need a high fiber diet for that.. so diet is a big problem for me. Gastroparesis is better if you eat lower fiber diet and the diverticulosis requires high fiber. Hitting a medium is not easy. Early last year I had a severe bout of diverticulitis. I eat a lot of green peas and carrots cooked tender. Green beans I do not do well with nor do I do well with black-eyed or any variety that is what we call a field pea. I can eat a few canned baked beans.. even some canned kidney bean in chili (mine has to be bland though☹️) Ground beef is the most easily digested meat for me. I have a hard time with chicken and pork.

It would be hard for the Mayo Clinic to name all fibrous foods, but yes, it might be a good idea to give a few examples. In the search bar of your browser type in: list of fibrous foods; and you should get some results.

Jump to this post

@fourof5zs

You have provided a lot of good examples of food choices! I agree that ground beef (or ground chicken/turkey) work better than other meats.

As there is no diet that would be good for everyone, it is important for each person to find out what is right for them. You have done a great job in finding out what works for you!

Liked by pdilly

Hi everybody,

I'd like to invite you to view this recently published post on the Connect "Gastroenterology & GI Surgery” Page. Madelynn Strong, clinical dietitian at Mayo Clinic, recommends strategies and foods that might help relieve symptoms of gastroparesis, and speed up gastric emptying.
Gastroparesis Diet Guidelines https://connect.mayoclinic.org/page/gastroenterology-and-gi-surgery/newsfeed/gastroparesis-diet-guidelines-1/

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