Eye evisceration

Posted by cahnny @cahnny, Nov 2, 2017

Are there any people here who have experience with having their eye eviserated. I hope I’m wording that correctly. Next week I’m scheduled to have my left eye eviserated. Although I’ve been blind in that eye for years due to chonic secondary glaucoma and uveitis and knew this day was coming, I’m still nervous. I think communicating with others who have gone through it would help. I’m not getting a full eye replacement right now. He’s just going to put a white “ball” in there to hold the shape of the eye and I’ll leave it at that for now. I’m in my 70s and want to keep the cost down so thought I’d just go with an eye patch for the time being so people don’t have to look at a blank white false eye. The doctor said I could have a “lense” put on the “ball” at a later date if I wanted to.

Hello @cahnny! Thank you for posting this conversation. What an important topic of discussion! I can understand how you would be nervous for this procedure. I’ve searched through discussions trying to find another member who has talked about similar circumstances and unfortunately I was unable to find anything. However, my favorite thing about Mayo Clinic Connect is that someone will come looking for this topic of conversation because they too are nervous about the very same thing and they will find this thread and hopefully at that time…you will be able to help them.

If you wouldn’t mind helping the future reader and if you feel comfortable sharing… What are your concerns? and fears? What kind of support has the hospital where you’re having the procedure given you in preparation?

I have worked a number of years in the Head and Neck cancer division and worked with plenty of patients that lost their eye due to cancer. No two patients were ever the same- I’ve met younger women that didn’t have a prosthetic eye placed, older men and women who did. One patient that I met wore a cute pink eye patch that was decked out in rhinestones! However, I wish you the best of luck with your procedure and follow up care after. Please come back for an update and let us know how you are doing- I will check back on you! 🙂

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@jamienolson

Hello @cahnny! Thank you for posting this conversation. What an important topic of discussion! I can understand how you would be nervous for this procedure. I’ve searched through discussions trying to find another member who has talked about similar circumstances and unfortunately I was unable to find anything. However, my favorite thing about Mayo Clinic Connect is that someone will come looking for this topic of conversation because they too are nervous about the very same thing and they will find this thread and hopefully at that time…you will be able to help them.

If you wouldn’t mind helping the future reader and if you feel comfortable sharing… What are your concerns? and fears? What kind of support has the hospital where you’re having the procedure given you in preparation?

I have worked a number of years in the Head and Neck cancer division and worked with plenty of patients that lost their eye due to cancer. No two patients were ever the same- I’ve met younger women that didn’t have a prosthetic eye placed, older men and women who did. One patient that I met wore a cute pink eye patch that was decked out in rhinestones! However, I wish you the best of luck with your procedure and follow up care after. Please come back for an update and let us know how you are doing- I will check back on you! 🙂

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Thank you Jamie: I’ll try to remember to come back and keep kind of a log. Just remind me if I slack off…lol. Right now I’m just trying to stay calm and relax. I’m having the procedure done at a specialist’s office. They have an ambulatory surgical section. There hasn’t been must “support” other than very nice people telling me what expect and when to be there.

There’s such a lonnng story leading up to this surgery that I wouldn’t know where to begin. I’ll just really try to capsule it and say… I had RA from an early age….too many steroids over a long period of time before the RA burned itself out. Steroids led to chronic glaucoma and uveitis which led to years of eye problems which finally led to this day. I have other medical issues to so that makes things a little more difficult.

As for what I’m having done right now. Friday the surgeon will perform an evisceration and insert a round globe to hold the shape of the eye. I can just live with that globe and wear a patch or…..I think he said a lense could be made to fit over the front of the globe that would look like a real eye lense. Because of my age and our financial situation and the distance I’d have to travel to go to someone who could make the lense, I’ll probably just live with the globe. I just have to find some place to buy soft patches that won’t irriate my face. My husband says he’s not concerned about the way I’ll look and I don’t go out much so I’m not going to be seen a lot anyway. I’ll just wear the patch when I leave the house.

I’ll come back after the surgery and tell you how it went.

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@jamienolson

Hello @cahnny! Thank you for posting this conversation. What an important topic of discussion! I can understand how you would be nervous for this procedure. I’ve searched through discussions trying to find another member who has talked about similar circumstances and unfortunately I was unable to find anything. However, my favorite thing about Mayo Clinic Connect is that someone will come looking for this topic of conversation because they too are nervous about the very same thing and they will find this thread and hopefully at that time…you will be able to help them.

If you wouldn’t mind helping the future reader and if you feel comfortable sharing… What are your concerns? and fears? What kind of support has the hospital where you’re having the procedure given you in preparation?

I have worked a number of years in the Head and Neck cancer division and worked with plenty of patients that lost their eye due to cancer. No two patients were ever the same- I’ve met younger women that didn’t have a prosthetic eye placed, older men and women who did. One patient that I met wore a cute pink eye patch that was decked out in rhinestones! However, I wish you the best of luck with your procedure and follow up care after. Please come back for an update and let us know how you are doing- I will check back on you! 🙂

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@cahnny, I just read your post, and although I am completely unfamiliar with the condition that you describe, I want to wish you a successful procedure. I know that it is hard to stay calm and to relax when facing a surgical procedure.
You mentioned that you don’t feel a whole lot of support from the doctor’s office and unfortunately, that is often the way it is. But, your husband sounds like a real gem! He is the support you can depend on.
You can count on my prayer as you go through this procedure and during your recovery.
Rosemary

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@jamienolson

Hello @cahnny! Thank you for posting this conversation. What an important topic of discussion! I can understand how you would be nervous for this procedure. I’ve searched through discussions trying to find another member who has talked about similar circumstances and unfortunately I was unable to find anything. However, my favorite thing about Mayo Clinic Connect is that someone will come looking for this topic of conversation because they too are nervous about the very same thing and they will find this thread and hopefully at that time…you will be able to help them.

If you wouldn’t mind helping the future reader and if you feel comfortable sharing… What are your concerns? and fears? What kind of support has the hospital where you’re having the procedure given you in preparation?

I have worked a number of years in the Head and Neck cancer division and worked with plenty of patients that lost their eye due to cancer. No two patients were ever the same- I’ve met younger women that didn’t have a prosthetic eye placed, older men and women who did. One patient that I met wore a cute pink eye patch that was decked out in rhinestones! However, I wish you the best of luck with your procedure and follow up care after. Please come back for an update and let us know how you are doing- I will check back on you! 🙂

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@cahnny, I hope that your procedure went well for you and that you are experiencing a steady recovery. Rosemary

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@cahnny

Thank you Jamie: I’ll try to remember to come back and keep kind of a log. Just remind me if I slack off…lol. Right now I’m just trying to stay calm and relax. I’m having the procedure done at a specialist’s office. They have an ambulatory surgical section. There hasn’t been must “support” other than very nice people telling me what expect and when to be there.

There’s such a lonnng story leading up to this surgery that I wouldn’t know where to begin. I’ll just really try to capsule it and say… I had RA from an early age….too many steroids over a long period of time before the RA burned itself out. Steroids led to chronic glaucoma and uveitis which led to years of eye problems which finally led to this day. I have other medical issues to so that makes things a little more difficult.

As for what I’m having done right now. Friday the surgeon will perform an evisceration and insert a round globe to hold the shape of the eye. I can just live with that globe and wear a patch or…..I think he said a lense could be made to fit over the front of the globe that would look like a real eye lense. Because of my age and our financial situation and the distance I’d have to travel to go to someone who could make the lense, I’ll probably just live with the globe. I just have to find some place to buy soft patches that won’t irriate my face. My husband says he’s not concerned about the way I’ll look and I don’t go out much so I’m not going to be seen a lot anyway. I’ll just wear the patch when I leave the house.

I’ll come back after the surgery and tell you how it went.

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Hello! My husband found this discussion and I am here because I am facing an eye evisceration now. It was this statement that really got me: "I had RA from an early age….too many steroids over a long period of time before the RA burned itself out. Steroids led to chronic glaucoma and uveitis which led to years of eye problems which finally led to this day. I have other medical issues to so that makes things a little more difficult." Me too! I've had juvenile RA since the age of 3, I'm 57 now. Lost the vision in my right eye 10 years ago due to glaucoma secondary to uveitis and longstanding steroid treatments. I'm really nervous about another surgery since I've had so many on my joints, including a neck fusion.

How did your procedure go? Forgive me if I missed that in this discussion because I am legally blind. Were you able to have it done outpatient? What about local vs. general anesthesia? Any complications? How is it living with that eye now? I'm really hoping to hear back from you because we seem to have much in common. Thanks for any input or advice you can offer!!

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@tlt

Hello! My husband found this discussion and I am here because I am facing an eye evisceration now. It was this statement that really got me: "I had RA from an early age….too many steroids over a long period of time before the RA burned itself out. Steroids led to chronic glaucoma and uveitis which led to years of eye problems which finally led to this day. I have other medical issues to so that makes things a little more difficult." Me too! I've had juvenile RA since the age of 3, I'm 57 now. Lost the vision in my right eye 10 years ago due to glaucoma secondary to uveitis and longstanding steroid treatments. I'm really nervous about another surgery since I've had so many on my joints, including a neck fusion.

How did your procedure go? Forgive me if I missed that in this discussion because I am legally blind. Were you able to have it done outpatient? What about local vs. general anesthesia? Any complications? How is it living with that eye now? I'm really hoping to hear back from you because we seem to have much in common. Thanks for any input or advice you can offer!!

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@tlt, Welcome to Connect. I do not have any experience to share with you about the upcoming eye surgery, however iIwant to reach out across the miles and offer my extended hand for support. I can imagine how the statement that you need it "now" must have affected you. I had a similar feeling when I heard those words in regard to needing an organ transplant, soon".
If it is any comfort to you, the medical field has made amazing advances in the area of ophthalmology (according to my retina specialist for a branch retinal vein occlusion). Have you met with the doctor who will be performing the surgery?

Like I said, I have no experience with this procedure, however I did locate this information from the American Society of Opthalmalic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery about Eye Removal (Enucleation & Evisceration)
It includes a summary of the procedure as well as risks and complications.
https://www.asoprs.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=95:enucleation—evisceration&catid=20:site-content
@tlt, Has the surgery been scheduled?

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@rosemarya

@tlt, Welcome to Connect. I do not have any experience to share with you about the upcoming eye surgery, however iIwant to reach out across the miles and offer my extended hand for support. I can imagine how the statement that you need it "now" must have affected you. I had a similar feeling when I heard those words in regard to needing an organ transplant, soon".
If it is any comfort to you, the medical field has made amazing advances in the area of ophthalmology (according to my retina specialist for a branch retinal vein occlusion). Have you met with the doctor who will be performing the surgery?

Like I said, I have no experience with this procedure, however I did locate this information from the American Society of Opthalmalic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery about Eye Removal (Enucleation & Evisceration)
It includes a summary of the procedure as well as risks and complications.
https://www.asoprs.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=95:enucleation—evisceration&catid=20:site-content
@tlt, Has the surgery been scheduled?

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Thank you so much! Losing a body part is never easy, I imagine, and that includes failing organs or eyes or anything else. And thank you for the link. My doctor told me I could wear a scleral shell to protect my eye, but he made it sound like eye evisceration is inevitable. I've had so so many surgeries that, if it is inevitable, I'd like to get it over with. It too would require a scleral shell (cosmetic, hand painted to match the other eye). I need to ask more questions of my doctor, which have popped up after the initial shock, but he is not returning my messages so far. I have an appointment later this month.

We'll take a look at the link and I can't thank you enough for reaching out with your support. I'd love to anyone who's had this surgery and can tell me what to expect with it. All the best!!

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@tlt, I want you to know that I am thinking of you. I hope that you have had the opportunity to talk with the doctor about the procedure and that you have had ample opportunity to ask all of your questions to him/her.
Have you met the doctor who will be performing the surgery? Are you more confident about undergoing the procedure?
Sending a virtual hug.

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@rosemarya

@tlt, I want you to know that I am thinking of you. I hope that you have had the opportunity to talk with the doctor about the procedure and that you have had ample opportunity to ask all of your questions to him/her.
Have you met the doctor who will be performing the surgery? Are you more confident about undergoing the procedure?
Sending a virtual hug.

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Hi, and thank you for checking in. I've met the surgeon who will perform the evisceration on two occasions, and surgery is scheduled for 4/22. I also met with a cosmetic ocularist to find out how that process will work (artificial eye).
My main concerns now are general anesthesia, and the many physical issues that complicate that. Bottom line, I would like to meet with the anesthesia department, but have been told "they don't need to meet with you until the day of surgery." Now, I'm wondering what my rights are in this process to ensure that I don't end up with a tube in my throat for a day or two later due to a collapsed trachea, and several weeks/months of speech therapy/swallowing clearance following this short procedure. This is what happened during the last surgery I had (2016) to fuse my cervical spine. The fusion further complicates intubation and LMA options. I say all of this to, admittedly vent a bit, but also to ask advice of those who may read it. My surgeon is supposed to contact me via phone to discuss all my concerns, and, hopefully, to consider a MAC (monitored anesthesia care) approach with local anesthetic.
I am taking deep breaths, trying to quell this particular anxiety.

Any suggestions on how to be a good self advocate in this situation? Thanks so much!!

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@tlt

Hi, and thank you for checking in. I've met the surgeon who will perform the evisceration on two occasions, and surgery is scheduled for 4/22. I also met with a cosmetic ocularist to find out how that process will work (artificial eye).
My main concerns now are general anesthesia, and the many physical issues that complicate that. Bottom line, I would like to meet with the anesthesia department, but have been told "they don't need to meet with you until the day of surgery." Now, I'm wondering what my rights are in this process to ensure that I don't end up with a tube in my throat for a day or two later due to a collapsed trachea, and several weeks/months of speech therapy/swallowing clearance following this short procedure. This is what happened during the last surgery I had (2016) to fuse my cervical spine. The fusion further complicates intubation and LMA options. I say all of this to, admittedly vent a bit, but also to ask advice of those who may read it. My surgeon is supposed to contact me via phone to discuss all my concerns, and, hopefully, to consider a MAC (monitored anesthesia care) approach with local anesthetic.
I am taking deep breaths, trying to quell this particular anxiety.

Any suggestions on how to be a good self advocate in this situation? Thanks so much!!

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@tlt, I have come across this link titled, 6 things to tell your anesthesiologist.
You will read that medications, health issues, and previous anesthesia reactions are some of the important things to discuss with your anesthesiologist (or doctor who will relay include them in your pre surgery report.) Before my transplant surgery, the anesthesiologist visited me in the pre-op area to make a final check of my medical history, to explain his role, to answer my questions, and to calm my fears.
https://www.mayoclinic.org/connected-care/6-things-to-tell-your-anesthesiologist/cpt-20502060
I think that a way to be a good advocate, is to feel confident to speak up and ask questions. Making a list has been very helpful to me.

Deep breaths are good!
I think that April 22 is an excellent date for surgery. That is the date that I had my liver and kidney transplant surgery, 12 years ago.

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