COVID-19: Not wanting to get it in the first place

Posted by matthewlee @matthewleehile, Apr 26 6:53pm

Is it not a good thing if a person never got the virus in the first place? Wouldn’t people on ventilators want the blood/plasma from a person who lived life to the fullest and never got the virus. If I was on a vent I think I would try.

Hello @matthewleehile – I see this is your first post.
Welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect, an online community where people can share experiences and ask each other questions about any health issue.
We're not medical professionals who can offer medical advice.

As someone who is Immuno compromised I totally agree with you that it would have been best if no one would ever have contracted Covid 19.
I also concur with you and I would suspect that a person on a ventilator, in most cases would want to receive plasma as long as it was safe, from any donor.

I these very difficult times, I feel anyone who is healthy and make time to donate blood/plasma are true gift givers to human kind.

Thank you for your post.

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@matthewleehile The theory behind antibody rich plasma from a Covid-19 survivor is that the antibodies will help the person who is ill overcome the virus. Plasma from someone without the antibodies would not have the same effect.
This is still being studied as a potential lifesaving treatment for critically ill patients- it has worked for some other illnesses and researchers are trying to determine whether it works for Covid-19.
As with everything related to this pandemic, stay tuned for further developments.
Sue

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@matthewleehile– Good morning and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. You bring up a great conundrum: if you have been living a healthy life will that affect your antibodies? And I have no idea! I think that if a person had a very healthy immune system because that person has been subjected to various insults to the body over the years and had COVID-19 and recovered it might be the answer. However, and it's a big, however, there is not any evidence, right now, that a person can establish immunity to COVID-19. @sueinmn explained beautifully about this. She's right too, we will have to wait and see what scientists come up with. Does this make sense?

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@merpreb

@matthewleehile– Good morning and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. You bring up a great conundrum: if you have been living a healthy life will that affect your antibodies? And I have no idea! I think that if a person had a very healthy immune system because that person has been subjected to various insults to the body over the years and had COVID-19 and recovered it might be the answer. However, and it's a big, however, there is not any evidence, right now, that a person can establish immunity to COVID-19. @sueinmn explained beautifully about this. She's right too, we will have to wait and see what scientists come up with. Does this make sense?

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@merpreb. I was in a weekly video chat with my children yesterday. We brought up the subject of the new CDC update of covid 19 symptoms. My daughter said in late February a couple of toes became inflamed and very very painful . Her doctor could not find out what was wrong. It went on for a few weeks when she could hardly fit into her shoes. During that same time, she had to use her inhaler more often than usual, but then she chalked that up to asthma. Looking back, she wondered if she had "covid toes", a symptom found in some covid patients. We questioned if her husband had got sick, she said he could be asymptomatic. We suggested if this virus is under control, she may want to test for antibodies. My daughter had never had chicken box, even though she was exposed repeatedly at home with my son and at school. She had her blood tested twice and she had no antibodies for chicken pox. She planned on coming down to see me this weekend for my birthday. My son suggested going to a park by his house. It's always empty, especially now and we'll bring our chairs and sit apart at a safe distance. I'm looking forward to it even though I would dearly love to give them big hugs.

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@mayofeb2020

@merpreb. I was in a weekly video chat with my children yesterday. We brought up the subject of the new CDC update of covid 19 symptoms. My daughter said in late February a couple of toes became inflamed and very very painful . Her doctor could not find out what was wrong. It went on for a few weeks when she could hardly fit into her shoes. During that same time, she had to use her inhaler more often than usual, but then she chalked that up to asthma. Looking back, she wondered if she had "covid toes", a symptom found in some covid patients. We questioned if her husband had got sick, she said he could be asymptomatic. We suggested if this virus is under control, she may want to test for antibodies. My daughter had never had chicken box, even though she was exposed repeatedly at home with my son and at school. She had her blood tested twice and she had no antibodies for chicken pox. She planned on coming down to see me this weekend for my birthday. My son suggested going to a park by his house. It's always empty, especially now and we'll bring our chairs and sit apart at a safe distance. I'm looking forward to it even though I would dearly love to give them big hugs.

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@mayofeb2020 I too am desperate to see and hug my children and grandchildren. We will be home by the weekend, and my daughters have planned a "driveway picnic" with us (our parks are closed because people wouldn't stay apart.) They are already coaching the 4 year old that he will be able to see us in person after over 4 months apart, but not yet hug (they had "something" in March and quarantined, which he sort of understood, so we think he can handle this.) HIs very creative auntie is planning shared but separate activities for us, and I'm so excited!
Sue

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@mayofeb2020

@merpreb. I was in a weekly video chat with my children yesterday. We brought up the subject of the new CDC update of covid 19 symptoms. My daughter said in late February a couple of toes became inflamed and very very painful . Her doctor could not find out what was wrong. It went on for a few weeks when she could hardly fit into her shoes. During that same time, she had to use her inhaler more often than usual, but then she chalked that up to asthma. Looking back, she wondered if she had "covid toes", a symptom found in some covid patients. We questioned if her husband had got sick, she said he could be asymptomatic. We suggested if this virus is under control, she may want to test for antibodies. My daughter had never had chicken box, even though she was exposed repeatedly at home with my son and at school. She had her blood tested twice and she had no antibodies for chicken pox. She planned on coming down to see me this weekend for my birthday. My son suggested going to a park by his house. It's always empty, especially now and we'll bring our chairs and sit apart at a safe distance. I'm looking forward to it even though I would dearly love to give them big hugs.

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@mayofeb2020– I don't know what to say about your daughter's toes. What does her doctor say? My son lives on the opposite coast than I do. I miss him terribly. I need his hugs!
@sueinmn– Our weather has been awful but a driveway picnic sounds so good. We share a dead-end with long time neighbors so I'll suggest that! Thanks for the idea.

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@merpreb The driveway picnic is an extension of our patio gatherings we have been having in Texas with our closest friends. I'm sure people looked funny at us with 2 5ft round tables placed end to end and just 6 people, but that's what we calculated was safe (along with the fact that we have all been self-isolating in our little park since March 13th) So far, amongst the roughly 100 people here, none has become ill. We are terribly impressed with how carefully most of our young neighbors are safeguarding their children, keeping them inside the park and limiting each to one or two (same) playmates from day to day. One of my friends is planning an event for them to make Mothers' Day cards this week, with supplies set up at separate tables for the children & Dads from each family.
Sue

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@mayofeb2020

@merpreb. I was in a weekly video chat with my children yesterday. We brought up the subject of the new CDC update of covid 19 symptoms. My daughter said in late February a couple of toes became inflamed and very very painful . Her doctor could not find out what was wrong. It went on for a few weeks when she could hardly fit into her shoes. During that same time, she had to use her inhaler more often than usual, but then she chalked that up to asthma. Looking back, she wondered if she had "covid toes", a symptom found in some covid patients. We questioned if her husband had got sick, she said he could be asymptomatic. We suggested if this virus is under control, she may want to test for antibodies. My daughter had never had chicken box, even though she was exposed repeatedly at home with my son and at school. She had her blood tested twice and she had no antibodies for chicken pox. She planned on coming down to see me this weekend for my birthday. My son suggested going to a park by his house. It's always empty, especially now and we'll bring our chairs and sit apart at a safe distance. I'm looking forward to it even though I would dearly love to give them big hugs.

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@mayofeb2020 I remember reading about Covid toes a few days ago.. You might find this interesting. Your daughter may want to get tested
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/health/2020/04/27/coronavirus-doctors-learn-more-new-covid-19-symptom-covid-toes/3031743001/

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