Cosmetic Botox for 60s Momma

Posted by strongmomma @strongmomma, Jul 13, 2022

I have been receiving botox injections in my neck for migraines for a few years, and just recently went with a girlfriend to her doctor who gave me cosmetic botox on my forehead and on the outsides of my eyes. As I am now in my 60s I have lots of wrinkles so I think I am a bit late for it to make a difference. Right? Do any of you have any relevant experience to share? I don't want to keep getting the cosmetic injections if the ship has already sailed if you know what I mean. In the meantime, I will keep using retinol to try to maintain some firmness on my face!

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Speaking from the ancient age of 80, and a mile or so above life in my sixties, I want to interject something. My ship has been sailing, at a cellular level since the day I was born, with. changes in my appearance each decade. About 30 years ago, I decided to accept the fact that my physiognomy would change relentlessly and that what I wanted was to look and be the age I am and learn what is most becoming within that context. I think of an aunt of mine, who lay smooth and poreless in her coffin with her 16-year-old's breasts pointing at the sky, her eyes and brows stretched into eternal shock and surprise, and her neck and the hands crossed on her chest looking like the cracked bottom of Lake Meade. I prefer to be a darn good-looking 80.

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@annecmvneg

Love your post! I am 81 years young and have seen too many Botox faces where the neck was neglected and there is not much you can do about the hands. Eat well, exercise, hydrate constantly, wear sunscreen, participate in life, take care of your hair and your teeth and use cosmetics sparingly. Don’t dress like a frump. Stand tall, don’t walk like an old person if you are able. And never look vulnerable. Love yourself and stop paying attention to magazines and tv commercials. And smile please when you are out and about.

I have a lot of crowns on my teeth but a nice smile and I will always keep my salon appointments.

Enough said

FL Mary

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They're not wrinkles, they are life experience lines! I love to spend time with my Mexican friends, where old age is revered and wrinkles are ignored. The only thing I refuse to do is dress in black like many of then do once past 70 or so.
At 70+ I work hard to keep my body and soul healthy and happy. I altered my makeup, hairdo and hair color to suit my age and dress in cheery clothes, but I don't worry about a few wrinkles, spots or sags.
If, on the other hand, you would be happier with fewer wrinkles, I say "Go for it!" Just try to avoid the look of eternal surprise that comes from overuse. And don't let them take away your ability to smile – it can be your beat feature.
Sue
Sue

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At 68 I stopped dying my hair. I am a grandmother. I didn't even know what color my hair truly was because I had been dying it for so long . . . turns out it is a beautiful shade of gray! I am a vain woman and I will tell anyone enjoy the stage of life you are in because you will never be here again! I wouldn't waste my money anymore on hair dye and embraced my wrinkles. I look in the mirror and I see my deceased mother's face. I don't want to change it today, but there was a time I did.

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Good on you. Embrace you and enjoy the journey

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@lindasmith1222

At 68 I stopped dying my hair. I am a grandmother. I didn't even know what color my hair truly was because I had been dying it for so long . . . turns out it is a beautiful shade of gray! I am a vain woman and I will tell anyone enjoy the stage of life you are in because you will never be here again! I wouldn't waste my money anymore on hair dye and embraced my wrinkles. I look in the mirror and I see my deceased mother's face. I don't want to change it today, but there was a time I did.

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Hi there, two years ago, during the lockdown, I stop co!oring and highlighting my hair. This was truly a liberating experience! My grey hair is healthy and shiny. I invest in a good haircut, and use products made for silver hair.

I don't want to look like someone who is 64 and trying to look like someone I am not. I am proud of me and this stage of my life. It has nothing to do with the color of my hair, It has to do with what I feel inside.

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@annecmvneg

Speaking from the ancient age of 80, and a mile or so above life in my sixties, I want to interject something. My ship has been sailing, at a cellular level since the day I was born, with. changes in my appearance each decade. About 30 years ago, I decided to accept the fact that my physiognomy would change relentlessly and that what I wanted was to look and be the age I am and learn what is most becoming within that context. I think of an aunt of mine, who lay smooth and poreless in her coffin with her 16-year-old's breasts pointing at the sky, her eyes and brows stretched into eternal shock and surprise, and her neck and the hands crossed on her chest looking like the cracked bottom of Lake Meade. I prefer to be a darn good-looking 80.

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I love this 😹
I do feel some things are okay to 'correct' if it's for medical reasons or if 'things get in the way' as can be the case after losing a lot of weight, for instance.
But I often stare at fake boobs that defy all logic and gravity, firmly in place no matter what on skinny frames. Or at ironed faces, its owners almost afraid to show any emotions for fear of creasing them. Unless of course they are no longer able to move anything because of the 'repairs'.
I wondered about a strange 'thing' between the eyebrows for ages, I saw it in some women, one is an actress and I thought it might be some sort of genetic disposition. Someone I know who works in a hospital woke me up: this is due to Botox, she explained, it can 'sink' and causes this effect.

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@lindasmith1222

At 68 I stopped dying my hair. I am a grandmother. I didn't even know what color my hair truly was because I had been dying it for so long . . . turns out it is a beautiful shade of gray! I am a vain woman and I will tell anyone enjoy the stage of life you are in because you will never be here again! I wouldn't waste my money anymore on hair dye and embraced my wrinkles. I look in the mirror and I see my deceased mother's face. I don't want to change it today, but there was a time I did.

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So good to read.
I too stopped dying my hair but I started doing it again. My hair is very long and it would take so long to get it all in the, as it turns out, kind of blondish grey it is. I keep a patch of natural colour in the back of my neck though, much to the surprise of the hairdresser ("You forgot a patch!", "I don't want to say anything, but…", and of course "You should…"). It makes me smile to see that blond patch pop out. I never was a blonde! I always had light brown hair so it's a surprise.

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@adr

Hi there, two years ago, during the lockdown, I stop co!oring and highlighting my hair. This was truly a liberating experience! My grey hair is healthy and shiny. I invest in a good haircut, and use products made for silver hair.

I don't want to look like someone who is 64 and trying to look like someone I am not. I am proud of me and this stage of my life. It has nothing to do with the color of my hair, It has to do with what I feel inside.

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Maybe one day I will get to this too, it was so liberating to me! No more toxins!
I decided to continue for two reasons; my hair is very long and it would take time, plus I am going through a very rough patch in my life and don't feel confident enough to stare at this grey that shows me all might be over soon. If I get healthy and happy I will do it though.

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@ellamster

I love this 😹
I do feel some things are okay to 'correct' if it's for medical reasons or if 'things get in the way' as can be the case after losing a lot of weight, for instance.
But I often stare at fake boobs that defy all logic and gravity, firmly in place no matter what on skinny frames. Or at ironed faces, its owners almost afraid to show any emotions for fear of creasing them. Unless of course they are no longer able to move anything because of the 'repairs'.
I wondered about a strange 'thing' between the eyebrows for ages, I saw it in some women, one is an actress and I thought it might be some sort of genetic disposition. Someone I know who works in a hospital woke me up: this is due to Botox, she explained, it can 'sink' and causes this effect.

Jump to this post

I've heard this said somewhere but can't remember wher, "I'd rather look old, than look odd."

makes sense to me.

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