As the Pandemic Spreads, So Can Our Thanks

Posted by fiesty76 @fiesty76, Nov 24, 2020

Many times over the past 8 mos, I've thought about how the wonderful members on these Mayo forums have made up an almost elite group in that we tend to be more conscious of and supportive of the measures recommended by our infectious disease experts as the pandemic has spread. Mayo Clinic, its staff and the wonderful supportive volunteer mentors of the Mayo Connect groups have proven a lifeline for many of us during this uncertain and frightening pandemic. Thanks to each of you and to the members in our forums for the time and efforts you've taken to keep us informed and encouraged.

Our state has been one of the worst in adhering to cautions from reputable public health experts and now my city, along with so many others throughout the U.S. are suffering the consequences of not only lack of available hospital beds but more importantly, lack of staff due to the horrific toll the virus has taken on those valiant warriors caring for the most ill.

This holiday, with my family safe and well out-of-state and more time to spend considering my "gratitudes", I'm sending notes of appreciation to each of my docs and their staffs for their "extra" efforts during this exceptionally difficult period in our history. It only takes a postage stamp and a few minutes to write a thank you to those who are daily putting themselves and their families at risk by caring for the rest of us.

I'm also thinking of our postal workers, vets, pharmacists and utility service workers who make sure we continue to receive the services we depend upon but rarely take an opportunity to thank. Maybe the approaching December holidays will provide an opportunity to thank them and others as well?

@fiesty76 so beautifully said and a truly wonderful way to spend our focus and energy during these next several weeks. Actively focusing on gratitude in a time that can feel so challenging really does provide a sense of light and hope not only to ourselves but to those who you take the time to thank and acknowledge.

Last year, I participated in The Last 90 Days Challenge, by Rachel & Dave Hollis. One of the five aspects of that challenge was taking the time each day to write down 10 things you are grateful for. The idea was that by focusing on the good, you inherently see more good in your daily life. The good starts to show itself in the most simple of ways when you stretch to list 10 things each day… like a green light when you are running behind or a smile from a stranger on a day that you needed one.

Anyway, please keep us posted if you get any feedback from your sharing of gratitude. I think we could all use it so much more than ever and the sharing is just as meaningful to the soul as receiving.

Who is first on your list to share with?

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I have started a letter of thanks that I will be handing to the front-line workers I encounter between December 6 and January 6 (my family celebrated from St Nicholas Day to the Feast of Kings when I was growing up.)

This will include cashiers, pharmacist & staff, restaurant staffs where we do takeout, waste collectors, postal workers, UPS drivers, baristas at the takeout window (my personal indulgence), food shelf workers, clinic staff and my PT office – probably others as I think of it. Where appropriate, I will enclose a small gratuity. If I had children in school, I would be including the entire staff, from bus driver to superintendent, because I have watched my daughter and nieces work HARD to try to continue serving "their" kids – often changing direction on a minute's notice.

It breaks my hear to listen to customers bad-mouthing and berating those who have held on and provided service, often at risk to their own health, through this pandemic.

And I will be sure to thank all the parents who are managing their children's remote learning while working from home themselves, teaching after work, on leave for loss of day care or dealing with the stress of Covid job loss.

Sue

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Happy Thanksgiving Everyone!
I find it peaceful to have members of this group sharing the same opinion of Covid-19. It’s so tiresome to even read the newspaper and all the negativity.
All of us have had to make some tough decisions to stay healthy. I will definitely have the vaccine, even though side effects may be unpleasant.
Enjoy the weekend!

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@amandajro

@fiesty76 so beautifully said and a truly wonderful way to spend our focus and energy during these next several weeks. Actively focusing on gratitude in a time that can feel so challenging really does provide a sense of light and hope not only to ourselves but to those who you take the time to thank and acknowledge.

Last year, I participated in The Last 90 Days Challenge, by Rachel & Dave Hollis. One of the five aspects of that challenge was taking the time each day to write down 10 things you are grateful for. The idea was that by focusing on the good, you inherently see more good in your daily life. The good starts to show itself in the most simple of ways when you stretch to list 10 things each day… like a green light when you are running behind or a smile from a stranger on a day that you needed one.

Anyway, please keep us posted if you get any feedback from your sharing of gratitude. I think we could all use it so much more than ever and the sharing is just as meaningful to the soul as receiving.

Who is first on your list to share with?

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@amandajro, Thank you for your kind response. I'm not familiar with the Last 90 Days Challenge. Is that a web site, book, or blog, perhaps?

Early in the pandemic I began jotting down a few gratitudes first thing each morning and again before going to bed in a spiral notebook. Doing that seems to get my day off to a better start and I try to add things so often taken for granted which takes a little thought time. It seems to help even more before bed as sometimes daily events and news can add additional stress and putting the focus on something I appreciate seems calming.

My pulmonologist, cardiologist and pcp and their staffs were the first notes to be mailed. These three docs are assigned hospital duty in addition to their clinic patient schedules. There are others to thank but two of these have small children at home and one is fostering a teenager so I can only imagine their concerns as they go to work each day.

I agree that sharing a thank you, much like sharing a sincere, heart felt apology is as helpful to the sender as receiver.

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I wish you all a Happy, if unusual, Thanksgiving. Even though I know I will not be sharing a table with my family today, I will be sharing food. My mood lifted immensely yesterday as the kitchen filled with the traditional aromas. The morning will be spent finishing and packaging the foods, to be delivered (hot) and ready to their doors. Then will we give thanks and eat together via Zoom.
Sue

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@sueinmn

I wish you all a Happy, if unusual, Thanksgiving. Even though I know I will not be sharing a table with my family today, I will be sharing food. My mood lifted immensely yesterday as the kitchen filled with the traditional aromas. The morning will be spent finishing and packaging the foods, to be delivered (hot) and ready to their doors. Then will we give thanks and eat together via Zoom.
Sue

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@sueinmn– Happy Thanksgiving Sue.

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@sueinmn

I have started a letter of thanks that I will be handing to the front-line workers I encounter between December 6 and January 6 (my family celebrated from St Nicholas Day to the Feast of Kings when I was growing up.)

This will include cashiers, pharmacist & staff, restaurant staffs where we do takeout, waste collectors, postal workers, UPS drivers, baristas at the takeout window (my personal indulgence), food shelf workers, clinic staff and my PT office – probably others as I think of it. Where appropriate, I will enclose a small gratuity. If I had children in school, I would be including the entire staff, from bus driver to superintendent, because I have watched my daughter and nieces work HARD to try to continue serving "their" kids – often changing direction on a minute's notice.

It breaks my hear to listen to customers bad-mouthing and berating those who have held on and provided service, often at risk to their own health, through this pandemic.

And I will be sure to thank all the parents who are managing their children's remote learning while working from home themselves, teaching after work, on leave for loss of day care or dealing with the stress of Covid job loss.

Sue

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@sueinmn– I do this every year for my doctors and other close friends. You are a sweetie pie

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Happy Thanksgiving Everyone- I am so grateful to have you all for my second family and to be a part of this very special group. Thank you for your friendships, guidance, and patience throughout this year.

Merry

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Hello, Fiesty76! I just read your gratitude message…stumbled on it as I'm learning this wonderful Connect maze…..You are wonderful! Thank you for spurring me on to do the same. I left the Mayo Clinic Jacksonville yesterday, after a day of testing and a visit with another marvelous Mayo doctor…left exhausted, physically/mentally/emotionally, and elated with the information he shared. I cared for my mother for over 12 years as she slowly deteriorated with altzheimers. Alone, with no family or other support. This was in 1980-1990's. She died in 2011. Obviously, I've been overly concerned about my cognitive abilities. Yesterday, I was told by the second expert, (1st was last week with Dr. Graff-Radford who treated my mother!) that there is no indication of cognitive issues! In fact, I'm improving! As I walked to my car, I began to hear the doctor's words. It took me most of the evening to realize 'I'm FREE!' The next thought was how do I say 'thank you' to all these precious doctors and staff who have brought me back to life over the last 2 years. You have the answer for me. Tomorrow is dedicated to writing individual notes to each doctor and other staff who have guided me through this journey. I first went to neurology for MS diagnosis…no MS, no Parkinson's, no Epilepsy(after 62 years of seizures), no Altzheimer's!!!!, thyroid under control, heart better, anxiety improved, sleep apnea treated….on and on. Now, I begin to live. Thank you, Fiesty 76! Thank you Mayo and all it has and is offering me. Thank you. ess77

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Hi, @ess77, Welcome to Connect! It is always great news when a member has such successful health reports to share from the medical experts! Doing a happy dance for your excellent, best possible recent report! Your relief and joy must just be starting to sink in. Wonderful!

For those of us who have been primary, sole caregivers for a loved one, we can relate to not only the vigilance and other physical, mental and emotional drains from that 24/7 care but oftimes the similar fears and apprehensions that we may also be diagnosed with the same debilitating condition(s). To be given the AOK that all is well is the best of all possible news!

I've told many a nurse and doc that one of the things I appreciate on visits is being able to go down that list of many conditions that we are asked to star if we have and being able to leave most of them unchecked!

So glad my post resonated with you and agree that Mayo Clinics and Connect groups are truly exceptional and one-of-a-kind gifts for us all. Hoping your new freeing lease on life will bring you back frequently to these great forums to continue sharing your journey whatever the days may bring. A good way to find groups you might like to continue with on Connect is to check out the Daily Summary. In addition to the health specific forums I participate in, two others are the "walking group and "just want to talk". Thanks for your post, your kind remarks and especially your great news! Take care.

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What a nice message from you, Fiesty76. Thank you. I'm only now feeling the huge lift off my back, my life. I suppose I have hope for the first time, that I will actually have a life, a future – I was working on accepting a pretty dire future. Been working on acceptance for several years, especially since I've been mis-diagnosed with MS and Parkinson's for over 12 years. I've lost so much time. Now, I can begin to live again, I can breathe and smile a real smile. Amazing feeling. I refuse to look back at the lost years. I'm only looking at this moment, this day and whatever the Good Lord has for me. I know He got me to Mayo!! I believe He got me to Connect…and to you. I'm very much alone. That's been an overwhelming emotion as I dealt with my mother for those years, whom I adored. And now, helping my disabled 53 year old son – dystonia since age 35. Now, we can work together to improve his present, get him to Mayo and to the treatments he needs. I'm so blessed. So thankful. I'm ckg out the 2 forums you mentioned. They sound interesting. Thank you for being here.

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@ess, As a longtime primary caregiver not only for my mom for 15 yrs, who was an amazing woman…never complained even to the last with her painful, debilitating illnesses, as well as my older sister who was mentally impaired and a nephew who became paraplegic from a tragic car accident, there were many years when I truly thought I'd never experience true freedom from the constant care of these family members. I share this only to emphasize how deeply I can relate to your new found exhilaration at your great news.

Like the first morning waking up feeling much better after days of being miserably ill, experiencing the joy you describe is one we can all celebrate!

I also appreciate your spirit of gratitude and your "can do" resolve going forward as you care for yourself and your son. Looking forward to your future posts.

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Thank you so much. You do truly understand. My goodness, what a feelng of thankfulness, gratitude, for you and this gift of Mayo, of Connect. Blessings to you.

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