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Are you Suffering from Nutrition Information Overload?

Posted by @drmichaelrothman in Men's Health, Dec 18, 2012

Blogs, magazines, news articles, Facebook. No matter where we turn these days, somebody is posting something about what is and isn’t healthy. With the abundance of health and nutrition information out there every day, it’s no wonder many of us suffer from nutrition information overload. So, what should you believe? Dr. Michael Rothman of MD Wellness in Red Bank, NJ, helps us separate fact from fiction with answers to the top seven nutritional questions.

Top Seven Health & Nutrition Questions

1. What are the benefits of fish oil pills?
The benefits of fish oil pills are much overhyped. The snake oil – whoops – fish oil salesman will tell you that “everybody is consuming too many omega 6 fatty acids” and therefore “you need fish oil to increase the omega 3/omega 6 ratio”. No, you don’t. There’s no doubt that too much omega 6 is highly inflammatory. But the solution to excess omega 6 is to stop consuming omega 6! Adding extra omega 3 will NOT reduce the toxicity of excess omega 6 fatty acids.

2. Why eat flaxseed? Will it make me healthier?
Why eat flaxseed? Flaxseeds are full of fiber and contain alpha linolenic acid. This may be of benefit to you, depending on your individual metabolic needs.

3. Should I take baby aspirin daily over age 50?
Aspirin has shown a statistical benefit to men over 50. However, you’re not a statistic – you’re an individual. So, should you take aspirin? Possibly, but again this depends on your individual metabolic needs and circumstances.

4. What are the healthiest oils to cook with?
Coconut oil and butter are both relatively sturdy oils with a significant amount of saturated fats, and therefore the healthiest oils to cook with. Do not cook with oils that contain significant amounts of unsaturated fats. These will become rancid and therefore toxic and pro-inflammatory upon exposure to high temperatures.

5. Is drinking a glass of red wine a day a good thing?
Grapes do contain Resveratrol, which has been shown in some studies to have anti-inflammatory properties. However, just because wine is made from grapes that contain Resveratrol, this does NOT mean that wine is good for you. If you like the taste and “buzz” you get from drinking red wine, you may consider this “a good thing”. However, if you think that drinking alcoholic beverages is going to help you to live longer or better, think again.

6. Are there dark chocolate benefits to health?
LOL! Do you believe in the tooth fairy or Easter bunny? Dark chocolate does contain antioxidants and flavonoids, which have been shown to have beneficial properties. However, this doesn’t mean that consuming chocolate is “good for you”. Chocolate contains sugar, and sugar is highly detrimental to your health.

7. Is kale really the best super food available?
Kale contains many health-promoting phytonutrients (plant-derived nutrients) and doesn’t contain metabolic poisons like sugar or alcohol (unlike chocolate and wine).

Is there something especially noteworthy about kale above and beyond other vegetables, making it a super food? Not necessarily. There are numerous vegetables that contain healthy phytonutrients, including Brussels sprouts, broccoli, carrots, spinach, asparagus, beets, tomatoes and many, many more. The bottom line is that vegetables (especially if organically grown) provide many healthy components to your diet. So eat your vegetables every day (just like mom always advised).

Chances are you have other questions about health and nutrition. If you’re confused about what to do or wondering what’s best for you, you can be certain of at least one thing. Proper, individualized holistic health nutrition can do wonders for your body and mind. Contact MD Wellness today for a consultation.

Tags: mens health, womens health, healthy living, holistic health, Nutrition

jtstinga and Anonymous like this

Posted by @jtstinga, Jan 26, 2013

Yeah can go much deeper with your argument here if you want to. Red wine? Ok, who did those scientists collect the data from primarily? Rich guys with great health insurance, or poor people on the street? It's not enough just to read an article about a study. We need to actually have it in our hands and decide for ourselves whether of not its a good choice or not from there.

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