Apple pie and ice cream.

Posted by jdiakiw @jdiakiw, Oct 3, 2020

Putting aside all other possible co-morbidities , I am trying to understand my data in my first week in my diagnosis and insulin injections. After a donut and coffee ( 1 tsp star) for breakfast. And fish and chips for lunch and a small serving of apple pie, I wonder does it matter what I eat as long as I am over 70% in my target zone and for the most part of a day I am in the optimum blue target area?

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I have thought it over, and am back to my number one reasoning. Sugar has no nutrients that are good for the body, so why eat it? It provides calories and energy to make the body run, so if you are on a desert island and hungry, with nothing to eat but deadwood, I suppose you could save your life with sugar. Not very logical if you are wanting overall good health and a well running body in your old age. When I attempted to be easy going about it all, my numbers kept creeping up and I got sleepier day by day. I couldn't work two Sudocku puzzles a day and get many chores done. I chose to get tougher on the diet and the numbers went down without as much exercise as I would like due to the bad back. I am winning the war on diabetes. I really don't want the risk of continuing to have the disease at a higher level if I can do something about it. And I don't need insulin. Perhaps my lazy insulin or my mitochondria will get busy and haul more sugar to my wasting muscles where it needs to be instead of turning into fat in my middle so I can't get into a decent looking dress. If that doesn't happen before my funeral, I have instructed my daughter to split my favorite lace dress in the back and drape it on me in the casket.
I am not being funny here, I really said that. One in a while I will cheat and make homemade ice cream with lots of fat. Slows down the spike, you know.
Then I come to my senses and get back on the program. It works well for me. Dorisena

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@dorisena

Of course, a person's blood sugar will spike after eating a high carb meal. But a person doesn't have to choose to have that happen as it could cause damage in the long term. My cousin was advised to not allow her blood sugar to go beyond 160 or 180. A nurse at a heart clinic advised me that any blood sugar over 200 on a regular basis is a cause for concern. My late husband would not test and laughed at his occasional numbers and high blood pressure. He wanted to show how tough he was. If you want to keep your diabetes at its current level and keep your insulin shots, then you can do that. Type two diabetics can do much better than "control" and in some cases can get back to normal blood sugar levels. Over time, my pre-diabetes became diabetes with growing numbers so I worked harder on my diet and can reach almost normal numbers every day. Remember, I had low blood sugar and had dizzy spells and didn't know what I was doing before I surprisingly creeped into pre-diabetes some years later. I thought I cured it with eating six times a day, low carb.. I gave up baking sweets as a start and then learned much more for my current state. Everything has a cause. I am not satisfied until I find reasons for my conditions. Dorisena

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I went to eye doctor about my eye sight changing they seen no problems said it can come from my sugar coming down because my glasses are to strong now.my numbers are still up there but there are getting lower but it seems everthing I eat raises my number specialist my doctor referred me to isn't taking new patients

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Yes, everything we eat can change the numbers. Also the numbers follow a pattern of going up for two hours after eating, and then dropping, and then slowly rising again and then up and down in a cycle. Keeping them from going too high means changing what you eat in addition to taking insulin shots if needed.
You can get lower numbers by modifying your eating and exercising more. Why wait? You need to find out what is considered too high for your situation and even that can change as you age. The insulin shot only changes things for a few hours. It is not the whole story. I am glad your eyes are doing well now.
Several of our readers complain that the numbers keep rising over time despite the pills and shots. Diet helps in the program to bring blood sugar numbers down to more normal levels. I hope this helps your understanding of the job at hand for better health. Dorisena

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I've been looking into trying to see what to eat what not exercising once I'm able to get with a doctor I think like you said to find a target level with more understanding I should have better results I'm thinking

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Good idea. I don't worry about a target level because the normal target level is 100 on the blood sugar and the closer I can get to that, the better I feel.
I don't know that there is a specific high target level and it is reasonable that it would vary for different people. A diabetic coma is a frightening thing, as is a stroke. Even a TIA or bloody eyes that my mother had is scary to me. Also we would like to keep our blood pressure at a "normal" level. That's hard to do sometimes. I am working on it and the numbers are going down. Dorisena

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The body does not know the difference between sugar and carbs like a potatoe. They are the same . One baked potato is equal to. 1 cup of sugar as far as how insulin is affected. Hi glycemic Carbs are the 5 big whites . Potatos rice sugar white bread . Good carbs are berries and many veggies. Are low on the glycemic index brown rice is lower than white rice

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That is very interesting, but not the whole picture when eating. I didn't know that a potato is equal to one cup of sugar. It matters how much butter and sour cream you put on the potato because the fat slows down the spike in sugar levels. I also put broccoli, red peppers, cheese, or anything else I might have, like chopped spinach, and make a meal out of it. Red Lobster restaurant used to have a loaded baked potato with lobster sauce on it. Yummy.
The same with the apple pie. Some apples are sweeter than others, and putting them in a pie crust with lots of fat slows down the sugar spike. I used to be able to eat one piece and get by without a spike, but not anymore. Yes, I agree about the veggies and berries. I have always eaten lots of veggies because we gardened and that is what we had available to eat. I really don't know how I got in trouble with diabetes except i baked too many goodies for my family.
And I had to give up my long walks because of bad knees. When I quit the sweets during the garden months, my knees didn't hurt so much. Eventually I had two replacements. I wish I had known more about inflammation and antioxidant foods. There's always more to learn. Dorisena

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@dorisena

Good idea. I don't worry about a target level because the normal target level is 100 on the blood sugar and the closer I can get to that, the better I feel.
I don't know that there is a specific high target level and it is reasonable that it would vary for different people. A diabetic coma is a frightening thing, as is a stroke. Even a TIA or bloody eyes that my mother had is scary to me. Also we would like to keep our blood pressure at a "normal" level. That's hard to do sometimes. I am working on it and the numbers are going down. Dorisena

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Yes it is scary that why I want to fight this now

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I have a 400 pge book of foods on the glycemic index. Anything over 50 is too high to eat much of and try to eat carbs below 50 Here is a Harvard medical brief but helpful foods 100 is maxed out on carbs but I remember on one list a potato was 110. Yikes.
https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/glycemic-index-and-glycemic-load-for-100-foods

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I lose a lot of weight if I keep to under 50

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