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ocp11
@ocp11

Posts: 2
Joined: Nov 20, 2018

ADHD

Posted by @ocp11, Mon, Nov 19 8:33pm

I recently stared my freshman year of high school. Talkative and excessively hyper are words that have always been closely assosciated with me. Also, lack of attention was a topic often talked about between my teachers parents, and a goal they often set for me. My parents, who I don’t blame whatsoever, dismissed these as issues requiring a doctor and figured I would grow out of this, which makes sense considering these were in my elementary days. Now, atleast 4 years later, I still experience all of these issues and more, at a heightened amount. As far as attention, I feel like I have no choice and fall victum to it. I can be paying attention to the most interesting thing and boom, my imagination swoops me out of wherever and I can’t pull my head out of the sky until it falls. I never felt weird in my hyperness, but my friends would often be like “chill” and I would be confused because I didn’t realize I wasn’t being chill. Anyways, to sum things up, I think I might talk to my parents and pediatrician, but I don’t want it to to seem like a cry for attention or such sorts. Should I talk to my parents/doctor about it or is this a normal experience for high schoolers? If I should seek help about this, I don’t really know how to. How do I?

REPLY

Hi, @ocp11 – Welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. Sounds like you are very perceptive about what is going on with you.

Here is some information from Mayo Clinic on ADHD https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/adhd/symptoms-causes/syc-20350889.

I'd like to introduce you to a few members who have mentioned ADHD or similar who might have some input on the behaviors and feelings you have noticed in yourself and also whether or how you might seek some help. Please meet @mamacita @dcwash @sumarie @kylemarshall04 @contentandwell.

I think it might be reasonable to present a list of symptoms from this Mayo information or another resource for what you think might be your diagnosis to your parents or directly to your doctor at your next well check, if you do those regularly, then mention how your symptoms/behaviors correlate with it. What do you think of that approach?

@ocp11– Hi -You should definitely talk to your parents and your doctor and follow up with Lisa Lucier's suggestions. Especially if you plan to go on to university. It would seem that your symptoms have increased so you need to get a proper diagnosis and possibly medication to get a handle on the situation. You are not weird- there are many many people who share this type of thing and it can definitely be treated.
Good luck!
Ainsleigh

Hi, @ocp11 good to meet you! I am @mamacita, a volunteer mentor for Mayo Clinic Connect. I was given your name here on Mayo Clinic Connect by a trusted fellow mentor. They felt I might have a few words to share.

I am not a medical practitioner by any means. But, I was ADHD all my life and didn't know it. I knew I was different, but everyone in my family is different, so I didn't particularly stick out. I would raise my hand in class even if I didn't know the answer. I had the energy of Wonder Woman. I could talk to anyone about anything, and never met a stranger. I would daydream in class. If I was interested in a subject, I could pay attention. If mot, trouble.

Your parents really will want to know if you are experiencing any of these symptoms. A good regular checkup to rule out other issues is a good first start. ADD and it's cousin ADHD can mimic other issues that are just as important. I did take medicine while I worked in the school system. Now that I don't have to punch a time clock, I don't. But I'll be like "Oh look, a squirrel." I get lots of housework done!

Really, your parents are your best friends in this situation. Let them know how all of this really makes you feel. The tests for ADHD have been refined and improved so much. So have a lot of other tests for similar conditions. Happy Thanksgiving! And here's to good news for you in the very near future! Talk to you soon!

Mamacita

Wow! I appreciate all of the responses. I'll try that approach @lisalucier. Thanks again for all the suppor!

@ocp11 It was apparent from when my son was quite young that he had ADHD, he had all of the symptoms, including impulsivity. When he was in first grade he had a very stern teacher who sent home "sad grams" if a child "misbehaved". Misbehaving to her could be something as minor as speaking in the hall. I could predict it, on days that were too cold or inclement for the students to go outside at lunch he would always have a "sad gram" because he hadn't been able to work off any of that energy. Interestingly though, many teachers really liked him a lot because he was always very polite and they knew he was trying.

It was in researching ADD and ADHD that I came to realize that I had it! I had a very high IQ and SAT scores but my grades were just average because I could not pay attention. Back then no one had heard of these diagnoses so they labeled me as an "underachiever" or just plain lazy.

My daughter is two years younger and hers was less noticeable at first because with girls there is often not the hyperactivity. She was very forgetful, and a dreamer. Her fourth-grade teacher told me that when her bus was called she would just get up and walk out, leaving her desk covered with things and often forgetting what she was supposed to be bringing home. She is a very brilliant and successful woman now though, and has pretty much learned how to compensate for her forgetfulness. When she was writing college essays she wrote one on having ADD and I remember her saying in it, it's not that you don't pay attention, it's that you pay attention to EVERYTHING. It sounds as if you may have that problem too.

When we were looking at colleges I absolutely ruled out large ones that would have huge auditorium classes for the required classes the first two years because I knew from my own experience without interaction I would literally doze off. I felt like they could transfer after their sophomore year if they wanted to, by then classes get smaller because they are more specialized, so that may be something you want to consider when that time comes.

My husband was very opposed to taking any action for their symptoms but we finally did at the end of their HS years. My son told me after taking meds for a little while that he was amazed, because he could now learn in class whereas before he had to try to learn everything at home since he couldn't pay attention in class. His outgoingness has been a real asset to him though, he's done very well also. He still needs a lot of activity but that's great, he's in terrific shape!

Please feel free to connect in a PM if you ever have anything you want to ask me about this. I know how tough it is, and I too deplore the thought of medications. I hope by now they have developed some strategies to help students with this type of problem. At one point, quite a while ago, I remember reading an article that said schools needed to adjust to the students' needs rather than the students who are all different adjusting to rigid standards that were impossible for some. My son and daughter did have a few great teachers who really knew how to get the most out of them, I was very thankful for those teachers. ADD and ADHD have become very controversial in this country because they are over-diagnosed, but if diagnosed correctly it really is a condition. I know from personal experience from both sides.

JK

Hello @ocp11

I am so impressed with how articulate and concerned you are about your own issues. I have a feeling you will be most successful in life because of your determination to analyze and take care of yourself.

Will you keep in touch and let me know how you are doing?

@occp11
How ya doing mate,
I really only wanted to say it can be dangerous to look up symptoms and rely on the internet or a forum of any type and decide on a diagnosis. Even people who have/had a specific problem aren’t qualified to come to any conclusions as to what may be happening, nor are you your parents or your teachers. Never assume anything. Only doctors possess the knowledge to come to an accurate answer. Problem is approximately 1 out of 5 people are incorrectly diagnosed with ADHD. Ask your doctor if you should see a specialist or a psychologist. Your doctor should be open to this question.
Best of luck,
Jake

You are absolutely correct, @jakedduck1. For years my ADHD went untreated because the professionals did not even consider it. They thought I was Bi Polar for a while. Autism and ADHD can look a lot alike. We need to find the best professionals we can in getting a proper diagnosis, whatever might be going on. Also, telling our medical practitioner everything that is going on with us will help to get a correct assessment. We don't need to be ashamed of any of our symptoms. They are keys to successful self care and a happy life.

Enjoyed our little "chat", my friend! Happy Thanksgiving!

Mamacita

@hopeful33250

Hello @ocp11

I am so impressed with how articulate and concerned you are about your own issues. I have a feeling you will be most successful in life because of your determination to analyze and take care of yourself.

Will you keep in touch and let me know how you are doing?

Jump to this post

@ocp11 I should have included that in my response, I too am very impressed. Most teenagers may be slightly aware but they are not pro-active about it. You obviously do not want this to limit you. Kudos to you.
JK

@jakedduck1

@occp11
How ya doing mate,
I really only wanted to say it can be dangerous to look up symptoms and rely on the internet or a forum of any type and decide on a diagnosis. Even people who have/had a specific problem aren’t qualified to come to any conclusions as to what may be happening, nor are you your parents or your teachers. Never assume anything. Only doctors possess the knowledge to come to an accurate answer. Problem is approximately 1 out of 5 people are incorrectly diagnosed with ADHD. Ask your doctor if you should see a specialist or a psychologist. Your doctor should be open to this question.
Best of luck,
Jake

Jump to this post

@jakedduck1 I'm quite surprised that it is only 1 out of 5 who are incorrectly diagnosed. I would have thought it was much higher. The same is true with bipolar. I have read that over 60% of people diagnosed as being bipolar are not.
You really do need to get to a specialist/psychologist. I believe this is beyond the ken of most regular doctors.
JK

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