Acupuncture helpful for peripheral neuropathy (PN)?

Posted by wisfloj @wisfloj, Tue, Aug 20 8:52am

18 sessions, twice a week and feeling it’s a waste of time and money. Still have good days and bad, trying PEA also, but would like to hear if acupuncture worked for anyone and perhaps I need to continue….? I guess trying one solution at a time is wiser. Thanks for sharing your experiences.

My acupuncturist said that if I did not get relief after 3 sessions, to stop coming. I got no relief, so I left. I cannot believe they have done it so many times with you already. Perhaps different philosophies? Anyway, it did nothing for me, but I only tried it 3 times. Lori

Liked by mlross4508

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@lorirenee1

My acupuncturist said that if I did not get relief after 3 sessions, to stop coming. I got no relief, so I left. I cannot believe they have done it so many times with you already. Perhaps different philosophies? Anyway, it did nothing for me, but I only tried it 3 times. Lori

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I too tried acupuncture 4 times for back pain, and felt relief for that day. I woke up the next day same pain as usual everyday. So I too never went back.

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@mlross4508 Good morning. My experience has taught me that this treatment, acupuncture, does not last for certain types of issues. Actually, my insurance company insisted that I try the following before they would approve my reverse shoulder surgery. (The first two surgeries, rotator repair, and cadaver grafts had not worked for what my surgeon called the Grand Canyon of holes.) 1. PT, he knew me well and although complying, said my pain was beyond his ability to have an impact with something that severe. Told me to come see him after surgery. 2. Pain pills. My local PCP gave me an RX even though he knew I was totally against opioids and would not take them. At least he could say he tried. 3. Acupuncture. The therapist was also a friend and she told me she could give me about 24 hours and then the pain would come rolling back.

I remember that my surgeon called the insurance company and sat on the floor with the phone for all the delays until he could get approval for the reverse. He kept saying, “ tried that”. So what was the problem? I was too young.

At this time, 2009, the reverse shoulder was new in the US. It was developed in France. Although approved here, the insurance companies were only approving it for folks 80 and older. Hopefully, any complications would not have time to show themselves before the person passed from other causes and would save them $$$.

He got approval for me at 68…….perhaps the youngest ever at that time. Together we watched a video of the surgery. Insurance insisted that an engineer from the company be present during the surgery. It was like being a special guest at a party when they rolled me into the surgical room. And lo and behold, the party continued after recovery.

The anesthesiologist showed up in my room. The surgeon came after his daughters swim meet and sat with me until he was nodding off in the chair. A nurse was at my side until I slept, without Ambien.

One more fact about this surgeon……he would do no more than two surgeries a day. He felt that he wanted to be bright-eyed and bushy-tailed for his patients. I honor everything he stood for. He has been an amazing resource for me and I ended up referring several other folks who had fallen down a mountain or something else just as risky. They are all climbing again. May you all find resources that free you from suffering. Chris

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Well I was going to a 'community acupuncture center', so for all of July my sessions were only $10 each and other times I would pay $15 or $20. So not too much loss other than my driving time. The acupuncturist was saying because I’ve had it so long (18 mo.)🤔 it’s going to take a while. I bought that until last Thursday when my worst days were Thursday Friday Saturday but Sunday was better. I am 75 % sure I won’t return unless other members weigh in here and tip my decision towards continuing. Thanks to you three!

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@artscaping

@mlross4508 Good morning. My experience has taught me that this treatment, acupuncture, does not last for certain types of issues. Actually, my insurance company insisted that I try the following before they would approve my reverse shoulder surgery. (The first two surgeries, rotator repair, and cadaver grafts had not worked for what my surgeon called the Grand Canyon of holes.) 1. PT, he knew me well and although complying, said my pain was beyond his ability to have an impact with something that severe. Told me to come see him after surgery. 2. Pain pills. My local PCP gave me an RX even though he knew I was totally against opioids and would not take them. At least he could say he tried. 3. Acupuncture. The therapist was also a friend and she told me she could give me about 24 hours and then the pain would come rolling back.

I remember that my surgeon called the insurance company and sat on the floor with the phone for all the delays until he could get approval for the reverse. He kept saying, “ tried that”. So what was the problem? I was too young.

At this time, 2009, the reverse shoulder was new in the US. It was developed in France. Although approved here, the insurance companies were only approving it for folks 80 and older. Hopefully, any complications would not have time to show themselves before the person passed from other causes and would save them $$$.

He got approval for me at 68…….perhaps the youngest ever at that time. Together we watched a video of the surgery. Insurance insisted that an engineer from the company be present during the surgery. It was like being a special guest at a party when they rolled me into the surgical room. And lo and behold, the party continued after recovery.

The anesthesiologist showed up in my room. The surgeon came after his daughters swim meet and sat with me until he was nodding off in the chair. A nurse was at my side until I slept, without Ambien.

One more fact about this surgeon……he would do no more than two surgeries a day. He felt that he wanted to be bright-eyed and bushy-tailed for his patients. I honor everything he stood for. He has been an amazing resource for me and I ended up referring several other folks who had fallen down a mountain or something else just as risky. They are all climbing again. May you all find resources that free you from suffering. Chris

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Just realized that I used a lot of words to respond to the post. Hmmm!

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After spending a lot of time and money on different treatments including laser therapy, Acupuncture has been the only modality helping me with my intense feet pain. I couldn't even walk before Acupuncture. My 24/7 numbness and tingling continue as always. I still having pain, but the debilitating pain is under control. The first month I received treatment weekly then every 2 weeks, now I'm having it monthly. If I have an exacerbation of pain, I call my acupuncturist. Is very important to verify the Acupuncture Physician credentials and previous patients reviews. Not all Acupuncturists have the same education and treatment approach.

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@chabela

After spending a lot of time and money on different treatments including laser therapy, Acupuncture has been the only modality helping me with my intense feet pain. I couldn't even walk before Acupuncture. My 24/7 numbness and tingling continue as always. I still having pain, but the debilitating pain is under control. The first month I received treatment weekly then every 2 weeks, now I'm having it monthly. If I have an exacerbation of pain, I call my acupuncturist. Is very important to verify the Acupuncture Physician credentials and previous patients reviews. Not all Acupuncturists have the same education and treatment approach.

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Hi, @chabela, and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. Thanks for sharing this positive treatment experience with acupuncture for your foot pain.

Will you share more about what the acupuncturist does during your sessions? How quickly after starting this therapy were you feeling some relief?

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@lisalucier

Hi, @chabela, and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. Thanks for sharing this positive treatment experience with acupuncture for your foot pain.

Will you share more about what the acupuncturist does during your sessions? How quickly after starting this therapy were you feeling some relief?

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Thank you for welcoming me to the group!
My acupuncturist places the needles on certain points on my lower extremities and forearms. She traces major nerve pathways and follows muscle borders in many instances. She explained to me that many of the recognized acupuncture points are located near a nerve branching or plexus, a gland, or an organ, and function by stimulating these structures into action by calling the body's attention to the area. She also treats me with Auriculotherapy, I was amazed the first time she started examining my outer portion of my ear with a fine ”stiletto” and she touched a point that was incredibly painful. When I ask her what was that, she showed me a chart and the intense pain was in a point which reflected my left heel ( the area that was bothering me the most at that time ).
My experience while on session is pleasant, relaxing, and not painful, only mild discomfort in certain insertion areas.
Sounds crazy but sometimes I enter her office limping with intense pain and left with minimal pain, being able to walk.
Is something can't be explained in terms of traditional medicine.
I have to make clear I continue using my medications daily ( Gabapentin and Cymbalta), but prior to Acupuncture despite medications and other treatments I wasn't able to walk. This treatment requires ”maintenance”, sadly as all of you understand, there is no cure. But being able to diminish pain intensity is Godsend.

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@chabela

Thank you for welcoming me to the group!
My acupuncturist places the needles on certain points on my lower extremities and forearms. She traces major nerve pathways and follows muscle borders in many instances. She explained to me that many of the recognized acupuncture points are located near a nerve branching or plexus, a gland, or an organ, and function by stimulating these structures into action by calling the body's attention to the area. She also treats me with Auriculotherapy, I was amazed the first time she started examining my outer portion of my ear with a fine ”stiletto” and she touched a point that was incredibly painful. When I ask her what was that, she showed me a chart and the intense pain was in a point which reflected my left heel ( the area that was bothering me the most at that time ).
My experience while on session is pleasant, relaxing, and not painful, only mild discomfort in certain insertion areas.
Sounds crazy but sometimes I enter her office limping with intense pain and left with minimal pain, being able to walk.
Is something can't be explained in terms of traditional medicine.
I have to make clear I continue using my medications daily ( Gabapentin and Cymbalta), but prior to Acupuncture despite medications and other treatments I wasn't able to walk. This treatment requires ”maintenance”, sadly as all of you understand, there is no cure. But being able to diminish pain intensity is Godsend.

Jump to this post

Hi, @chabela – thanks for sharing your experiences with acupuncture for your peripheral neuropathy. @summertime4 talked about planning to get acupuncture and perhaps could share about it if this treatment has started? @jager5210 @arcticmark @mlross4508 also mentioned getting acupuncture — not necessarily for neuropathy-related pain, but for pain -— and may have some thoughts for you.

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@lisalucier

Hi, @chabela – thanks for sharing your experiences with acupuncture for your peripheral neuropathy. @summertime4 talked about planning to get acupuncture and perhaps could share about it if this treatment has started? @jager5210 @arcticmark @mlross4508 also mentioned getting acupuncture — not necessarily for neuropathy-related pain, but for pain -— and may have some thoughts for you.

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@lisalucier Hi I start acupuncture on Sept 24 2019. I would love to hear from others who are doing acupuncture and will provide my experiences when I begin. I am praying it will offer some relief for all of us involved.

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My reply won’t encourage you, sorry in advance. I had 18 treatments, two per week. She used 20-25 needles per session, I relaxed for an hour. Overall no change so I decided to save my time and money. Some say immediate difference so I hope that’s the case for you. Ten years ago when I had shingles it helped immediately, and then only twice more for good measure! So it can certainly work! Best wishes to you

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Hello, Acupuncture is like any other treatment it helps some people and some conditions. What I have heard is that you need to try at least 10 sessions in rapid succession and see if it works. I had three completely different acupuncturists, the first took 2 1/2 hours per session with lots of meditation between changes in needles and positions. Great music, very relaxing ultimately felt that it took too much time and a massage felt better. I only did I think 4 treatments with this guy, who by the way was the nicest guy. The next ones were a husband and wife team who took 20 minutes per session and felt that patients were shared so I talked to the husband about my bad back and neuropathic pain and after a few sessions the wife pinch-hit and gave me my treatments and then back to the husband. I did 12 sessions with them and didn't feel better so stopped. Then a friend in DC who had a chinese doctor help with Hep-C from a blood transfusion in Africa and swore by both Chinese herbs and acupuncture got me to see a Chinese doctor who his doctor in DC identified as the best acupuncturist in Boston. I saw him for 14 times tried chinese herbs and it just didn't work. I have Chinese colleagues who see Chinese doctors and take Chinese herbs for any ailment and they and my friend all have been dramatically helped by acupuncturists.

All that being said, if you have tried it 14 times and it isn't working for you, I would think you've given it a good try and you might want to try something else. The only caveat to that is my Chinese colleagues have told me that Chinese medicine works slowly and most westerners can’t slow down enough to let the medicine in. They say that they don't like the quick fix of western medicine and like the slow, but they feel longer lasting cures from Eastern medicine. It might be worth a little reflection on whether you have given it a chance to heal you, or whether you might need a different attitude to really give it a chance to work.

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I am trying PEA also!

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@burningfeetinphoenix

I am trying PEA also!

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PEA helped me at the 9th week, give it time. Best wishes

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@wisfloj

PEA helped me at the 9th week, give it time. Best wishes

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Thanks! I am hopeful. Ordered the topical today as well…Pam

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