Accepting Your Symptoms

Posted by njp1013 @njp1013, Mon, Sep 23 3:03pm

Hi everyone. I am finding for me I feel a lot better when I accept my symptoms and give myself time to heal. But I also find I have a great deal of difficult doing that because of the fear the symptoms cause in me and the need to hold it together at work and with my kids. Do any of you have any tricks/pointers you use to help you accept your symptoms?

Liked by bluej295

Hi, @njp1013 – that is interesting that you mention accepting your symptoms. I was feeling anxious this summer with just having moved to a house we purchased across town and the fact that our new home has more traffic noise at some hours of the day than I'd realized pre-purchase, in addition to the anxiety and stress of all the work involved in moving.

One of the techniques my mom said her friend taught her was "radical acceptance." This concept is referenced in this Psychology Today article and in many other places https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/pieces-mind/201312/three-blocks-radical-acceptance.

Interesting to think that I can choose to stop fighting whatever I am anxious about and just try and accept. In my case, it was to love my new house for all its beauty and wonderful features we didn't have before, yet accept its warts and that it is not perfect. Maybe this goes against the ideal of a "dream house," but I think that for many, a house that is perfect in every way is illusory and not completely in reality financially and otherwise.

What symptoms in particular are you talking about accepting, njp1013?

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@lisalucier thank you i will read that article! for me the symptoms right now are insomnia (waking up between 330-4 every day), lots of sweating, lots of anxiety, loss of appetite, crying at the drop of hat, inability to focus on things i enjoy or work..all the typical good stuff that comes with anxiety and depression i guess :-(, going thru the hell month of getting back on antidepressants. i understand your house anxiety too..for the longest time my wife and i felt guilty about having a home that was too small for our family not a single family home etc etc…caused so much financial stress and pointless striving for more..we finally accepted we are happy where we are and that helped alot.

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wow thanks just read the article, using anger as a secondary emotion to block my primary emotions pretty much sums up what got me here…working on that in therapy.

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@njp1013

@lisalucier thank you i will read that article! for me the symptoms right now are insomnia (waking up between 330-4 every day), lots of sweating, lots of anxiety, loss of appetite, crying at the drop of hat, inability to focus on things i enjoy or work..all the typical good stuff that comes with anxiety and depression i guess :-(, going thru the hell month of getting back on antidepressants. i understand your house anxiety too..for the longest time my wife and i felt guilty about having a home that was too small for our family not a single family home etc etc…caused so much financial stress and pointless striving for more..we finally accepted we are happy where we are and that helped alot.

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@njp1013 – that's helpful to know that the symptoms of depression and anxiety you are trying to accept while you heal are insomnia, sweating, loss of appetite, feeling anxious, crying at the drop of a hat and inability to focus on work or things you enjoy. That's an interesting point that you find it difficult to accept your symptoms at times due to the fear that arises from your symptoms.

Hoping that some of these members might have some tricks/pointers you might use to help you accept your symptoms, like @mandrake70 @cdcc @contentandwell @grandmar @sandij @mommabird74, especially in light of trying to hold it together at work and with your kids.

In all honesty, I think that getting an increase in my dosage of fluoxetine (Prozac), along with time and trying to keep more in control of my thoughts (instead of letting them control me and ruminating on what I was anxious about) also helped me out, along with acceptance.

In addition to trying to accept them, are you finding anything helpful thus far with addressing any of the symptoms you mentioned? Any nights where something helped you sleep longer, for instance?

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@lisalucier

@njp1013 – that's helpful to know that the symptoms of depression and anxiety you are trying to accept while you heal are insomnia, sweating, loss of appetite, feeling anxious, crying at the drop of a hat and inability to focus on work or things you enjoy. That's an interesting point that you find it difficult to accept your symptoms at times due to the fear that arises from your symptoms.

Hoping that some of these members might have some tricks/pointers you might use to help you accept your symptoms, like @mandrake70 @cdcc @contentandwell @grandmar @sandij @mommabird74, especially in light of trying to hold it together at work and with your kids.

In all honesty, I think that getting an increase in my dosage of fluoxetine (Prozac), along with time and trying to keep more in control of my thoughts (instead of letting them control me and ruminating on what I was anxious about) also helped me out, along with acceptance.

In addition to trying to accept them, are you finding anything helpful thus far with addressing any of the symptoms you mentioned? Any nights where something helped you sleep longer, for instance?

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chamomile tea seems to help, and my symptoms seem to abate at night time, kinda ramp up again before bed though as i get anxious about sleeping. also being with my family always seems to help..my wife is very understanding of this and has helped me so much.. i wouldnt mind the not sleeping if i could use the time doing things i enjoy but unfortunately in the state im in when i wake up early i dont feel i can enjoy anything, but maybe i havent tried hard enough, maybe tomorrow will make a cup of tea and try to read the paper or something..

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First of all, it’s ok to not be ok. Don’t try to fake it. Tell people you are not feeling well today. I mean dont be negative but don’t pretend because then it builds up inside and that has to be released eventually. Also know that you will get better. Don’t trap yourself in the sick role… be a survivor. It’s a tricky thing to be both you know. Also people may never truly understand so know that this is your battle to fight and unless someone has gone through this, they won’t fully understand. I weened antidepressants after 20 years, lexapro. My last pill was February 5th of this year. I feel better than when I was taking it. Also have weened Xanax and currently weening trazadone. What helped me get through the really hard times was God, music, exercise, diet, being real with people around me, crying for as long as I needed and not holding back, seeking out homeopathic md and found root cause. Good luck! I’m routing for you!!!

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I agree that one has to accept that it is okay to be ill, it happens to us more frequently perhaps, but it is important to realize that while we are sick we are not abnormal or flawed individuals. As crazy as it sounds, I have learned much from my illnesses about how to be stronger and how to be a more empathetic person. The price of being sick is sometimes at the brink of what we think we can bear, but when we carry forth we should understand that we are fit in ways that people cannot understand; just as they do not know what it means to be severely depressed, to live with chronic illness, or to know how we are able to live despite our maladies. While we are strong we also need to know when to take help and when we are at our limits.

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@mommabird74

First of all, it’s ok to not be ok. Don’t try to fake it. Tell people you are not feeling well today. I mean dont be negative but don’t pretend because then it builds up inside and that has to be released eventually. Also know that you will get better. Don’t trap yourself in the sick role… be a survivor. It’s a tricky thing to be both you know. Also people may never truly understand so know that this is your battle to fight and unless someone has gone through this, they won’t fully understand. I weened antidepressants after 20 years, lexapro. My last pill was February 5th of this year. I feel better than when I was taking it. Also have weened Xanax and currently weening trazadone. What helped me get through the really hard times was God, music, exercise, diet, being real with people around me, crying for as long as I needed and not holding back, seeking out homeopathic md and found root cause. Good luck! I’m routing for you!!!

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thank you i appreciate your support! that is awesome that you are feeling good and doing so well. you are right, it is ok to not be ok..everyone goes thru times that they are not ok and i do believe i will get better. thanks again.

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@guener

I agree that one has to accept that it is okay to be ill, it happens to us more frequently perhaps, but it is important to realize that while we are sick we are not abnormal or flawed individuals. As crazy as it sounds, I have learned much from my illnesses about how to be stronger and how to be a more empathetic person. The price of being sick is sometimes at the brink of what we think we can bear, but when we carry forth we should understand that we are fit in ways that people cannot understand; just as they do not know what it means to be severely depressed, to live with chronic illness, or to know how we are able to live despite our maladies. While we are strong we also need to know when to take help and when we are at our limits.

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@guener thank you and very well said.

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@lisalucier

@njp1013 – that's helpful to know that the symptoms of depression and anxiety you are trying to accept while you heal are insomnia, sweating, loss of appetite, feeling anxious, crying at the drop of a hat and inability to focus on work or things you enjoy. That's an interesting point that you find it difficult to accept your symptoms at times due to the fear that arises from your symptoms.

Hoping that some of these members might have some tricks/pointers you might use to help you accept your symptoms, like @mandrake70 @cdcc @contentandwell @grandmar @sandij @mommabird74, especially in light of trying to hold it together at work and with your kids.

In all honesty, I think that getting an increase in my dosage of fluoxetine (Prozac), along with time and trying to keep more in control of my thoughts (instead of letting them control me and ruminating on what I was anxious about) also helped me out, along with acceptance.

In addition to trying to accept them, are you finding anything helpful thus far with addressing any of the symptoms you mentioned? Any nights where something helped you sleep longer, for instance?

Jump to this post

@lisalucier @njp1013 I think the type of anxiety that njp experiences is different from any anxiety i have experienced. When I have had these problems it’s been a reaction to a stressful situation or worry about something that I can’t control anyway. I have never been on drugs except for a very occasional lorazepam when some worry causes sleepless nights.

When I have had anxieties or been depressed I have always found that if I can get myself motivated to do something it takes my mind off of things, at least for that amount of time. Before I retired I welcomed going to work when I had troubles. It is more difficult if you don’t have to do something.

I wish I could be more helpful, but this is not really within my personal experience.
JK

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@njp1013 Insomnia is the worst since it tends to make depression and anxiety worse. I am still working with my doctor to see about sleep medication since none of the other things I have tried have worked. If none of the tricks for getting back to sleep after you wake up at 4:00 seem to help, you may want to see about talking to your doctor about it. Also, have you looked into sleep hygiene (https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/sleep-hygiene)? Have you done a sleep study? I have been waking up around that time, or earlier, most mornings as well for the past month or so. I really sympathize with what you are going through but it is good to hear that your wife is supportive of you. I know it is hard to focus on yourself when you have your kids to worry about but it is something you need to do to get better. Does your boss know what you are going through right now or is he/she not someone you can talk to?

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@mandrake70 for me the insomnia is a symptom of the anxiety/depression as much as it is a cause, when i am fine i sleep fine, but when i have a depressive epsiode i have early waking. my psych doc prescribed me ambien to help me sleep while we wait for the effexor to kick in but unfortunately has not been helping very much. unfortunately i think its just a matter of toughing out this ramp up on my meds and then the sleep will come, that is how it has worked for me in the past. im on day 10 now and my psych doc says for the first two weeks i shouldnt expect any benefit, which is consistent with what ive experienced in the past. yesterday afternoon and night i felt really good so hopefully slowly but surely i am getting there.

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@njp1013 I understand. Ambien didn't help me either. I'm glad to hear that the insomnia will go away as soon as your medication kicks in. Try to focus on that and the fact that you were feeling better last night. It will get better and hopefully soon. Best wishes.

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@mandrake70 thanks very much, this site is great and everyones support means a lot

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@lisalucier

@njp1013 – that's helpful to know that the symptoms of depression and anxiety you are trying to accept while you heal are insomnia, sweating, loss of appetite, feeling anxious, crying at the drop of a hat and inability to focus on work or things you enjoy. That's an interesting point that you find it difficult to accept your symptoms at times due to the fear that arises from your symptoms.

Hoping that some of these members might have some tricks/pointers you might use to help you accept your symptoms, like @mandrake70 @cdcc @contentandwell @grandmar @sandij @mommabird74, especially in light of trying to hold it together at work and with your kids.

In all honesty, I think that getting an increase in my dosage of fluoxetine (Prozac), along with time and trying to keep more in control of my thoughts (instead of letting them control me and ruminating on what I was anxious about) also helped me out, along with acceptance.

In addition to trying to accept them, are you finding anything helpful thus far with addressing any of the symptoms you mentioned? Any nights where something helped you sleep longer, for instance?

Jump to this post

My doc is moving me from Escitalipram to Prozac. I’m happy to see that you feel better on this med. it gives me hope for reigning in this dreadful anxiety!

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