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fraukt2 (@fraukt2)

Don't know what kind of specialist to see

Just Want to Talk | Last Active: Oct 27, 2012 | Replies (86)

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@terri

Well, you can check out this article: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/03/health/research/03disease.html. I first read about this organization in the AARP magazine. There is a sobering statistic that 30% of all deaths coming into emergency room were caused by undiagnosed diseases.

I had two serious diseases that went undiagnosed for years. One was Graves disease, which I had in the 1980’s, and the second was hyperparathyroidism, which was diagnosed this year. Both times I knew there was something terribly wrong with me, but I couldn’t get any doctor to believe me. Before I was diagnosed in either case, I went to several doctors who dismissed my symptoms as being from an easily explained source: stress, bad lifestyle, and later–menopause or too much caffeine.

The only way I finally received a proper diagnosis was to keep changing doctors until one did the right test. That was all it took. If they don’t do the right test, you’re out of luck.. This seems to happen in a lot of cases. And for people like you who have no health insurance, to not get the right diagnosis the first time means you’re out of money and you have no cure. That’s just not fair.

I happen to be a public school teacher. Right now, the heat is on for teachers and their students to meet high standards or they lose their jobs and they fail. It seems to me a lot of doctors are failing to diagnose a lot of us early enough to save us from the dire consequences of having any number of body destroying diseases. The information is out there for them to do the right diagnosing, but they are not using it. Is it incompetence or is the medical profession becoming so overtaxed that doctors can’t do a thorough job? Whatever–you shouldn’t have to pay until you get the right diagnosis. This is why I’m all for health care reform.

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Replies to "Well, you can check out this article: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/03/health/research/03disease.html. I first read about this organization in the..."

Thank you for your reply. My mom and I didn’t really catch the fact that our calcium levels were all over the place until she made a page with all of our abnormal lab results. She has looked into Hyper/hypoparathyroidism and it’s one of the things she would like to have us tested for. The one time my sister’s pth was tested, it was normal and her calcium level was on the high side, which kind of confused the doctor.

Check out this web page and all the pages on this site: http://parathyroid.com/diagnosis.htm

Hyperparathyroidism is a nasty, nasty disease, but it was such a relief to get an affirmative diagnosis that I could do something about. I did have surgery and am now recovering.

“Before I was diagnosed in either case, I went to several doctors who dismissed my symptoms as being from an easily explained source: stress, bad lifestyle, and later—menopause or too much caffeine.”

Oh my gods, this is happening to me, right now. I am currently trying to get treatment and a concrete diagnosis from doctors who, frankly, do not care about their patients. I was even threatened with being sent to a mental health clinic, just before a blood test (which I had been requesting for monthS) finally came back positive for a condition that I suspected – vitamin D deficiency. I became sick, again, and well.. you can read my profile lol.

I waited an additional *8 weeks* for today’s appointment, only to be told after waiting half an hour in the examination room that my doctor wasn’t even coming in! I had to talk to so many people, just to get the follow-up blood test I was Supposed to get, today.

My cat gets better treatment at the vet. I actually asked the vet, once, if they could pretend I was a cat, but they said they would lose their license if they treated a human.

My mom and sister have a Vitamin D deficiency, but their B12 is fine. I have a severe B12 deficiency, but my D is fine. Was your follow-up test something to determine what’s causing your D deficiency? It takes up to a year to build Vitamin D back up to an appropriate level.

a TSH level is in a Complete Metabolic lab test. TSH indicates how your thyroid is working.

Thank you. We’ve had TSH levels tested. They’re always normal, except my sister had an abnormally high 3rd generation thyroid test earlier this year at a health fair. She went to an endocrinologist and had it rechecked and it was normal again. The endo. told her the health fair probably mishandled her blood sample. Does anyone know if it’s possible to have a thyroid problem with tests that are sometimes normal?

I didn’t realize that my mom and I had high thyroid tests a few years ago, too, that went back to normal a couple of weeks later. Maybe thyroid tests are affected by the way the blood is handled and it’s mishandled a lot? I think it’s weird that we would all have high results then back to normal so quickly.

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