World No Tobacco Day May 31, 2022

May 25 11:00am | Angie Murad | @muradangie | Comments (5)

 

Cigarette smoking in the United States remains the leading cause of preventable disease, disability, and death in the United States according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Cigarette smoking has declined from 20.9% in 2005 to 12.5% in 2020. Quitting smoking lowers the risk for 12 types of cancer: cancers of the lung, larynx, oral cavity and pharynx, esophagus, pancreas, bladder, stomach, colon and rectum, liver, cervix, kidney, and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Smokeless tobacco also causes cancers in the esophagus, mouth and throat, and pancreas. It is also important to avoid secondhand smoke.

If you or a loved one is a smoker or uses other tobacco products, you know you should quit but that is often easier said than done. One way to increase your chances of quitting is to create a quit-smoking plan. Here are a few ideas to help you begin to plan:

  • List your reasons for quitting seeing your reasons on paper can help reinforce and justify your reason for quitting.
  • Pick a day to quit picking a specific day, i.e., within a month, will give you time to prepare. Evidence shows stopping smoking abruptly results in more long-term quitting.
  • Prepare for your quit day a combination of medical treatments and behavioral counseling improves your success in quitting.
  • Ask your doctor about medications before your quit day. Some treatments or medications must be started before you quit to be effective.
  • Find a support program The Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center was one of the first centers in the United States to focus exclusively on treatments for tobacco dependence. Click the link to learn more about the program. Another great resource is Become An Ex which uses knowledge from Mayo Clinic Experts as well as a social community to provide tips and advice. Other programs like the National Cancer Institute’s telephone quite line, 877-44U-QUIT or your state’s quit line, call 800-QUIT-NOW can be another resource.
  • Tell people letting family and friends know you are committing to quitting will help them become a helpful ally.
  • List your triggers and habits make a list of common triggers or typical smoking habits. This will help you come up with other distractions or strategies other than smoking
  • Handling quit day getting through those first few days and months can be difficult emotionally and physically. Here are a few ideas to help you through the early days and beyond.
    • Keep physically active
    • Avoid situations and people that can trigger the urge to smoke
    • Practice stress management and relaxation techniques
    • Go back to that list for quitting
  • Staying quit, having a plan leads to success. Rely on your physician, friends, and a support group or program to help you stay the course.

If you recently quit smoking what worked for you?

Connect with others on these Groups within Mayo Clinic Connect:

Addiction and Recovery

Just want to Talk

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It can be done. Take control of your life. I can attest to the fact it takes determination.

REPLY
@quimbie

It can be done. Take control of your life. I can attest to the fact it takes determination.

Jump to this post

I'm curious to hear what steps you took to stop smoking?

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@muradangie

I'm curious to hear what steps you took to stop smoking?

Jump to this post

I tried to quit many times and would succeed for a short time them right back to smoking. I smoked light and I smoked heavy. I have faith in God so I told God I would quit. You have to keep that promise. However, I used an idea that came to me. Whenever I wanted a smoke and it was often I would run it through my mind. I would see myself taking the cigarette, striking match or lighter and lighting it and then inhaling the first drag and the good feeling then I would imagine the dizziness I would have after not having one for a while and then feel the feeling that I failed again and be sorry for that. I had to run that through my head many, many times. especially after a meal or stress. This really helped me as it is a mind game. I smoked for at least 15 years heavy and now as an old lady can say after 46 years never had one again. I can smell a smoker in the next aisle at store or anywhere. Very sensitive to the smell. Just remember it is a mind game that can set you free. I actually think about it ever once in a while still after all this time. Hope this helps some for you. Take time to think about it.

REPLY
@quimbie

I tried to quit many times and would succeed for a short time them right back to smoking. I smoked light and I smoked heavy. I have faith in God so I told God I would quit. You have to keep that promise. However, I used an idea that came to me. Whenever I wanted a smoke and it was often I would run it through my mind. I would see myself taking the cigarette, striking match or lighter and lighting it and then inhaling the first drag and the good feeling then I would imagine the dizziness I would have after not having one for a while and then feel the feeling that I failed again and be sorry for that. I had to run that through my head many, many times. especially after a meal or stress. This really helped me as it is a mind game. I smoked for at least 15 years heavy and now as an old lady can say after 46 years never had one again. I can smell a smoker in the next aisle at store or anywhere. Very sensitive to the smell. Just remember it is a mind game that can set you free. I actually think about it ever once in a while still after all this time. Hope this helps some for you. Take time to think about it.

Jump to this post

the mind is powerful! I like how you describe how you almost thought thru the entire process and came up with a plan. Very helpful!

REPLY

This really did work for me. I am very happy that it did as I have had a few health issues but none from smoking. The mind is a good tool to use.

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